Faubourg d'Amiens Cemetery

Arras, France

The French handed over Arras to Commonwealth forces in the spring of 1916 during the World War I and the system of tunnels upon which the town is built were used and developed in preparation for the major offensive planned for April 1917. The Commonwealth section of the Faubourg d'Amiens Cemetery was begun in March 1916, behind the French military cemetery established earlier. It continued to be used by field ambulances and fighting units until November 1918. The cemetery was enlarged after the Armistice when graves were brought in from the battlefields and from two smaller cemeteries in the vicinity.

The cemetery contains over 2,650 Commonwealth burials of the First World War, 10 of which are unidentified. The graves in the French military cemetery were removed after the war to other burial grounds and the land they had occupied was used for the construction of the Arras Memorial and Arras Flying Services Memorial.

The adjacent Arras Memorial commemorates almost 35,000 servicemen from the United Kingdom, South Africa and New Zealand who died in the Arras sector between the spring of 1916 and 7 August 1918, the eve of the Advance to Victory, and have no known grave. The most conspicuous events of this period were the Arras offensive of April-May 1917, and the German attack in the spring of 1918. Canadian and Australian servicemen killed in these operations are commemorated by memorials at Vimy and Villers-Bretonneux. A separate memorial remembers those killed in the Battle of Cambrai in 1917.

The adjacent Arras Flying Services Memorial commemorates more than 1,000 airmen of the Royal Naval Air Service, the Royal Flying Corps, and the Royal Air Force, either by attachment from other arms of the forces of the Commonwealth or by original enlistment, who were killed on the whole Western Front and who have no known grave.

During the Second World War, Arras was occupied by United Kingdom forces headquarters until the town was evacuated on 23 May 1940. Arras then remained in German hands until retaken by Commonwealth and Free French forces on 1 September 1944. The 1939-1945 War burials number 8 and comprise 3 soldiers and 4 airmen from the United Kingdom and 1 entirely unidentified casualty. Located between the 2 special memorials of the 1914-1918 War is the special memorial commemorating an officer of the United States Army Air Force, who died during the 1939-1945 War. This special memorial, is inscribed with the words 'Believed to be buried in this cemetery'. In addition, there are 30 war graves of other nationalities, most of them German.

Both cemetery and memorials were designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens, with sculpture by Sir William Reid Dick.

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Details

Founded: 1916
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in France

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Cris John Clark (2 years ago)
If you have not visited this memorial to the soldiers and pilots of The Grand Guerre (Geeat War) you must.
Ian Ferris (3 years ago)
Imagine all the gravestones you see were soldiers standing to attention. Then add in all those whose bodies were not found but whose names are inscribed on the memorial. Sobering. These were all very brave young men, some very young indeed, all of whom did not return home. The horror of war, never to be repeated.
shona marshall (3 years ago)
Stunningly poignant. Went on 10th November in the morning when it was pouring with rain. Seemed appropriate weather to remember the fallen.... Visited that night for the 'Great Vigil', where lanterns and balloons were lit and poetry, prose and songs were performed and pipers played. Moving, humbling experience.
Thomas Currie (3 years ago)
My late grandmother Bella lost two brothers James O'Neill 34306 and Patrick 1860 at the battle of Arras this cemetery is kept in perfect order a real credit to the staff well worth a visit
Dave Parsons (3 years ago)
Lovely place in a lovely town, will need to go again when upgrading work has finished on it as my Great Great Uncle Private Edward Brothwood's name is on the wall as he has no known grave.
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