Tallinn Town Hall

Tallinn, Estonia

Tallinn Town Hall, located in the main square, is the only surviving Gothic town hall in Northern Europe. The first recorded mention of the Town Hall dates from 1322. Its present form dates from 1402-1404, when the building was rebuilt. The spire was destroyed in an aerial bombing on March 9, 1944. It was rebuilt in 1950. The Town Hall is in the list of UNESCO World Heritage Sites with the Tallinn's Old Town.

The building has two main storeys and an almost full-sized cellar. The main façade is supported by an open arcade with eight piers and topped by a crenellated parapet. High gables and a pitched roof make the building elegant, but the slender octagonal projecting tower with a gallery for bells gives it particular finesse. The tower is crowned by a late Renaissance spire comprising three cupolas and open galleries.

Today the Town Hall is a representative building of Tallinn City Government, concert hall and museum. The entire building is open to the public in July and August, when less official receptions are held. In other times, visits must be agreed with the Town Hall in advance (except the cellar exhibition).

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Details

Founded: 1322
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Estonia
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jessica D. Pang (2 months ago)
Best free wifi i found in the old town. The view is beautiful too.
Kristjan S (2 months ago)
One of the most important historical places and certainly worth visiting if possible.
Joaquín Sánchez-Valiente Stutz (3 months ago)
The surroundings of the town hall reminded me of a theme park, with waiters and waitresses of the nearby pubs dressed in old fashioned outfits, but that is modern day tourism. However, I appreciate their effort to make "the fake" look real, and all the buildings in the area -and the town hall itself- are beautiful to see, so it is worth the walk.
Joyce Tang (4 months ago)
The square itself is historical, having existed since the middle ages, and surrounded by lovely buildings and the city hall. There will be a lot of people in this square, so be aware of your belongings. I would not suggest purchasing any drinks or food around the square- tourist traps, and it'll be very crowded with people too. Essentially, enjoy the square, but do not spend too long at the square - there are plenty of other things to do in Old Town Tallinn!
Lucas Kovács (6 months ago)
This is a great place to visit. Most of the texts have an English translation, there are many recreations and it’s full of history. There’s one thing to consider though; the tower isn’t included on the price, and you won’t be able to buy it in the same place. The tower costs 3 extra euros and is located on the left of the main entrance. You can’t pay for the tower with card. There’s a great view from the top of the tower.
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Lübeck Cathedral

Lübeck Cathedral is a large brick-built Lutheran cathedral in Lübeck, Germany and part of the Lübeck UNESCO World Heritage Site. In 1173 Henry the Lion founded the cathedral to serve the Diocese of Lübeck, after the transfer in 1160 of the bishop's seat from Oldenburg in Holstein under bishop Gerold. The then Romanesque cathedral was completed around 1230, but between 1266 and 1335 it was converted into a Gothic-style building with side-aisles raised to the same height as the main aisle.

On the night of Palm Sunday (28–29 March) 1942 a Royal Air Force bombing raid destroyed a fifth of the town centre. Several bombs fell in the area around the church, causing the eastern vault of the quire to collapse and destroying the altar which dated from 1696. A fire from the neighbouring cathedral museum spread to the truss of the cathedral, and around noon on Palm Sunday the towers collapsed. An Arp Schnitger organ was lost in the flames. Nevertheless, a relatively large portion of the internal fittings was saved, including the cross and almost all of the medieval polyptychs. In 1946 a further collapse, of the gable of the north transept, destroyed the vestibule almost completely.

Reconstruction of the cathedral took several decades, as greater priority was given to the rebuilding of the Marienkirche. Work was completed only in 1982.

The cathedral is unique in that at 105 m, it is shorter than the tallest church in the city. This is the consequence of a power struggle between the church and the guilds.

The 17 m crucifix is the work of the Lübeck artist Bernt Notke. It was commissioned by the bishop of Lübeck, Albert II. Krummendiek, and erected in 1477. The carvings which decorate the rood screen are also by Notke.

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In the funeral chapels of the southern aisle are Baroque-era memorials by the Flemish sculptor Thomas Quellinus.