Tallinn Town Hall

Tallinn, Estonia

Tallinn Town Hall, located in the main square, is the only surviving Gothic town hall in Northern Europe. The first recorded mention of the Town Hall dates from 1322. Its present form dates from 1402-1404, when the building was rebuilt. The spire was destroyed in an aerial bombing on March 9, 1944. It was rebuilt in 1950. The Town Hall is in the list of UNESCO World Heritage Sites with the Tallinn's Old Town.

The building has two main storeys and an almost full-sized cellar. The main façade is supported by an open arcade with eight piers and topped by a crenellated parapet. High gables and a pitched roof make the building elegant, but the slender octagonal projecting tower with a gallery for bells gives it particular finesse. The tower is crowned by a late Renaissance spire comprising three cupolas and open galleries.

Today the Town Hall is a representative building of Tallinn City Government, concert hall and museum. The entire building is open to the public in July and August, when less official receptions are held. In other times, visits must be agreed with the Town Hall in advance (except the cellar exhibition).

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Details

Founded: 1322
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Estonia
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jessica D. Pang (9 months ago)
Best free wifi i found in the old town. The view is beautiful too.
Kristjan S (9 months ago)
One of the most important historical places and certainly worth visiting if possible.
Joaquín Sánchez-Valiente Stutz (10 months ago)
The surroundings of the town hall reminded me of a theme park, with waiters and waitresses of the nearby pubs dressed in old fashioned outfits, but that is modern day tourism. However, I appreciate their effort to make "the fake" look real, and all the buildings in the area -and the town hall itself- are beautiful to see, so it is worth the walk.
Joyce Tang (11 months ago)
The square itself is historical, having existed since the middle ages, and surrounded by lovely buildings and the city hall. There will be a lot of people in this square, so be aware of your belongings. I would not suggest purchasing any drinks or food around the square- tourist traps, and it'll be very crowded with people too. Essentially, enjoy the square, but do not spend too long at the square - there are plenty of other things to do in Old Town Tallinn!
Lucas Kovács (13 months ago)
This is a great place to visit. Most of the texts have an English translation, there are many recreations and it’s full of history. There’s one thing to consider though; the tower isn’t included on the price, and you won’t be able to buy it in the same place. The tower costs 3 extra euros and is located on the left of the main entrance. You can’t pay for the tower with card. There’s a great view from the top of the tower.
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