Alexander Nevsky Cathedral

Tallinn, Estonia

The Alexander Nevsky Cathedral is an orthodox cathedral in Tallinn. It is built to a design by Mikhail Preobrazhensky in a typical Russian Revival style between 1894 and 1900, during the period when the country was part of the Russian Empire. The Alexander Nevsky Cathedral is Tallinn's largest and grandest orthodox cupola cathedral. It is dedicated to Saint Alexander Nevsky who in 1242 won the Battle of the Ice on Lake Peipus, in the territorial waters of present-day Estonia. The late Russian patriarch, Alexis II, started his priestly ministry in the church.

The Alexander Nevsky Cathedral crowns the hill of Toompea where the Estonian folk hero Kalevipoeg is said to have been buried according to a legend (there are many such legendary burial places of him in Estonia). The cathedral was built during the period of late 19th century Russification and was so disliked by many Estonians as a symbol of oppression that the Estonian authorities scheduled the cathedral for demolition in 1924, but the decision was never implemented due to lack of funds and the building's massive construction. As the USSR was officially non-religious, many churches including this cathedral were left to decline. The church has been meticulously restored since Estonia regained independence from the Soviet Union in 1991.

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Details

Founded: 1894-1900
Category: Religious sites in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Janet For Heaven's Cakes - 4hcakes (2 years ago)
Beautiful building. It's worth the fairly steep walk up to it.
Andrea Hardy (2 years ago)
It's an old church. If you've seen one, you've basically seen 90% of any other church. On our tour, we learned it's actually a newer church for the area. You cannot take any pictures inside. It does have a gift shop.
Rahul Kumar (2 years ago)
Nice quiet tourist place. The outside and inside of the Cathedral is quite beautiful and you also have a castle nearby. Overall nice place to relax. Walk and visit
Markus Oberer (2 years ago)
Nice onion-domed, Russian Orthodox Church. A fix stop on every tourist city loop. But be aware. The place is for worship, so photos are prohibited.
George On tour (2 years ago)
The large and richly decorated Russian Orthodox church, designed in a mixed historicist style, was completed on Toompea Hill in 1900, when Estonia was part of the Czarist Empire. The well-maintained cathedral is one of the most monumental examples of Orthodox sacral architecture in Tallinn. Tallinn’s most powerful ensemble of church bells is located in the church towers. It comprises 11 bells, including Tallinn’s largest bell, which weighs 15 tonnes. Carillons by the entire ensemble can be heard before services. The interior, which is decorated with mosaics and icons, is worth a visit.
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