Great Guild Hall

Tallinn, Estonia

Since the 14th century craftmen’s guilds were significant brotherhoods who drove interests of their members. The big guild of Tallinn was an union of wealthy merchants. Their base was the Great Guild Hall in downtown, opposite the church of Holy Spirit. The building itself was built in 1407-1410 and is a well-preserved sample of Medieval construction.

Today the Great Guild Hall houses a museum presenting Estonia's history from prehistoric times right up to the end of the 20th century. Films and interactive displays show how people here lived, fought and survived over the last 11,000 years.

References: Tallinn Tourism

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Address

Pikk 17-19, Tallinn, Estonia
See all sites in Tallinn

Details

Founded: 1407-1410
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Estonia
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sam Tambago (2 years ago)
The Great Guild Hall, nice place to know Estonia's history.
Andrei Darin (2 years ago)
Nice little museum. Has a large coin collection.
Marko Uibo (2 years ago)
Really modern museum and it's a perfect size. You get nice and interesting overview in sensible time, so it's a good idea to step in while having a walk in the Old Town.
Prince FR (2 years ago)
A nice museum in the old centre of Tallinn. The museum present a good overview of the estonian history since the last ice age and is well worth a visit even if you're in a bit of a hurry.
Michael Buckland (2 years ago)
An intriguing and captivating stroll through the history of Estonia! We spent about an hour here which was enough time to check everything out. Well out together and a great insight into the history of the Estonian people from 9000 BC through to today.
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