Great Guild Hall

Tallinn, Estonia

Since the 14th century craftmen’s guilds were significant brotherhoods who drove interests of their members. The big guild of Tallinn was an union of wealthy merchants. Their base was the Great Guild Hall in downtown, opposite the church of Holy Spirit. The building itself was built in 1407-1410 and is a well-preserved sample of Medieval construction.

Today the Great Guild Hall houses a museum presenting Estonia's history from prehistoric times right up to the end of the 20th century. Films and interactive displays show how people here lived, fought and survived over the last 11,000 years.

References: Tallinn Tourism

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Address

Pikk 17-19, Tallinn, Estonia
See all sites in Tallinn

Details

Founded: 1407-1410
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Estonia
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

M KA (2 years ago)
If you're a history buff, or enjoy collections of old historical items, weapons, coins as well as enjoy reading about and viewing historical exhibitions, then you should pay a visit to this museum. The museum is not too big in size, but it has three floors, impressive collections and a lot of interesting information (also in English) about the old times and how people used to live. It also has a lot of information about the great guilds and their part in the community during the old days. Definitely worth a visit for anyone that's interested in history!
Russell Mulcahy (2 years ago)
We visited this at the end of our stay but really should have visited our first. It's a great, and surprisingly engaging, walk through all the things you are going to ask yourself during your visit. Thoroughly recommended.
Kishikawa Tarz (2 years ago)
Well kept, maintained, and displayed. Facilities are very clean and On the 2nd floor, many coins displayed well! Recommend underground floor to explore to cool down if it is hot outside. Minimum one to two hours and I wanted three hours to go through! Enjoyed a lot!
George On tour (2 years ago)
The mediaeval Great Guild Hall has always played an important role in the life of the city. The permanent exhibition at the History Museum, 'SPIRIT OF SURVIVAL. 11,000 years of Estonian History' (opened in 2011), helps to understand the uniqueness of the people who have lived in Estonia and introduces historical events that have affected them the most. The exhibition discloses the story of Estonian past through rooms with different topics, such as the Gun Room that tells about wars, the exhibition 'Power of the Elite' that talks about the Great Guild and mediaeval trade. You can also see different currencies and take part in historical events in the interactive time capsule.
Robin Cuthbertson (2 years ago)
Interesting museum in the centre of Tallinn. The building is the old Guild House, the museum staffand are very helpful, and one of them was kind enough to take the time to tell us all about the history of the building and the exhibits, which really brought the museum to life. There is an audio guide that you can rent, or download via an app on your phone. I could not get the app to work, so really appreciated the explanations from the staff there.
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