The Church of Holy Spirit

Tallinn, Estonia

The Church of Holy Spirit is the only sacred building from 14th-century Tallinn preserved its original form. The church was originally founded as part of the neighbouring Holy Spirit Almshouse, which tended to the town's sick and elderly. Throughout Medieval times it remained the primary church of the common folk. First Estonian-language sermons were held there, and the famous Livonian chronicler Balthasar Russow worked as a teacher there in the late 16th century.

Before entering the church, take a look at the façade, where there is clock that has been measuring time since the 17th century. The interior is richly decorated an exquisite example of wooden sculpture from the Gothic era. The altar, commissioned from Berndt Notke in 1483, is one of the four most precious medieval works of art in Estonia. Services in English are held every Sunday at 15:00. Musical hours are held each Monday starting at 18:00.

References: VisitEstonia, Tallinn Tourism, TallinnEstonia.eu

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Address

Pühavaimu 2, Tallinn, Estonia
See all sites in Tallinn

Details

Founded: 1319
Category: Religious sites in Estonia
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kai Põld (9 months ago)
A 14th century Catholic church. Dear to the heart of every Estonian,because from Wandrad/Köell Cathecism 1535 we take the history of the Estonian language printed books. Altar commissioned from Lübek made by Berndt Nodtke, who also is the author of Dance Macabre in the Niguliste Church. Anglicani services too. .
Gaijin (12 months ago)
Originally consecrated in the early 13th Century. After the Reformation, the first Estonian sermons, supplanting the German versions, were held here and Johann Koell's Catechism, written by the pastor of the church and published in 1535, is considered the first book in Estonian. The exterior façade has a beautiful clock which has been keeping time here since the 17th Century. The church has a roll of honour, listing the 112 British RN sailors who lost their lives in the Baltic Sea operations 1918~20 which enabled Estonia and Latvia to declare independence from the Bolshevik USSR. Many are buried in Tallinn. CHURCH OPEN FOR TOURISTS  Monday to Saturday: 0900 - 1800 Sunday: between services.  Entry fee applies.
Keith H (14 months ago)
Peaceful quiet church in the. Middle of busy Tallin
Derek Brereton (15 months ago)
Please like if this review is helpful
Sue Leffler (15 months ago)
Church is quite beautiful inside with wonderful stain glass window with interesting paintings even on along the aisle side of some of the pews. Shortly after entering there was amazing music with 3 musicians singing and playing old instruments including a recorder, drum, lute and hurdigurdis (spelling?) Acoustics were wonderful.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Hochosterwitz Castle

Hochosterwitz Castle is considered to be one of Austria's most impressive medieval castles. The rock castle is one of the state's landmarks and a major tourist attraction.

The site was first mentioned in an 860 deed issued by King Louis the German of East Francia, donating several of his properties in the former Principality of Carantania to the Archdiocese of Salzburg. In the 11th century Archbishop Gebhard of Salzburg ceded the castle to the Dukes of Carinthia from the noble House of Sponheim in return for their support during the Investiture Controversy. The Sponheim dukes bestowed the fiefdom upon the family of Osterwitz, who held the hereditary office of the cup-bearer in 1209.

In the 15th century, the last Carinthian cup-bearer, Georg of Osterwitz was captured in a Turkish invasion and died in 1476 in prison without leaving descendants. So after four centuries, on 30 May 1478, the possession of the castle reverted to Emperor Frederick III of Habsburg.

Over the next 30 years, the castle was badly damaged by numerous Turkish campaigns. On 5 October 1509, Emperor Maximilian I handed the castle as a pledge to Matthäus Lang von Wellenburg, then Bishop of Gurk. Bishop Lang undertook a substantial renovation project for the damaged castle.

About 1541, German king Ferdinand I of Habsburg bestowed Hochosterwitz upon the Carinthian governor Christof Khevenhüller. In 1571, Baron George Khevenhüller acquired the citadel by purchase. He fortified to deal with the threat of Turkish invasions of the region, building an armory and 14 gates between 1570 and 1586. Such massive fortification is considered unique in citadel construction.

Since the 16th century, no major changes have been made to Hochosterwitz. It has also remained in the possession of the Khevenhüller family as requested by the original builder, George Khevenhüller. A marble plaque dating from 1576 in the castle yard documents this request.

A specific feature is the access way to the castle passing through a total of 14 gates, which are particularly prominent owing to the castle's situation in the landscape. Tourists are allowed to walk the 620-metre long pathway through the gates up to the castle; each gate has a diagram of the defense mechanism used to seal that particular gate. The castle rooms hold a collection of prehistoric artifacts, paintings, weapons, and armor, including one set of armor 2.4 metres tall, once worn by Burghauptmann Schenk.