According the legend, the Gertrudiskerk was founded the church in 654 by Saint Gertrude of Nivelles, abbess of the abbey in Nivelles. The older part of the church consisting of the towers, dates to around 1370. These were later incorporated in probably the 14th and 15th century when changes were made to the church. The current church building, completed in 1477 was designed by Evert Spoorwater. He devised a new chancel with chancel ambulatory and vaults in the ship style of the Brabantine Gothic.

In 1489 Anthonis submitted to Keldermans a design for a new church in the Late Gothic style. In spite of a constant lack of money, a new chancel and transept were realized. During the troubles of 1580 the church was plundered and thereafter used as a military warehouse. A cannonade by the French in 1747 left the church devastated. In 1750 rebuilding efforts started again, albeit with a more sober character. The church was 9 meters lower after being rebuilt.

In 1586 the church was arranged for reformed services. The new chancel and transept were completed and in 1698 were demolished. Thus only a small part remained of the second transept. Material was needed at this time for the construction of fortifications.

From 1586 to 1966 the reformed congregation had this building in possession. In 1747 the building burned down after the bombardment by the French. Rebuilding took place using Protestant funds and Protestant stones. The reformed congregation retained control through the 1950s and 1960s and people began to regret that more and more. It appeared an impossible task to maintain such a large building. In 1966 the church was transferred to the municipality so the government could restore the building.

New misfortune struck the church again in 1972 when a fire broke out. The whole interior including the 18th century pipe organ by Louis Delhaye II was lost. In the 1980s restoration started anew. In 1987, the church was again inaugurated by the bishop of Breda.

Engraving by Erasmus Quellinus and Richard Collin of the Tomb of Willem van der Rijt and Judith van Aeswyn, 1641Among the interior features are a stained glass window honoring Saint Gertrudis, two pulpits, three Flemish confessionals and an Ibach pipe organ from 1863. Also some sepulchral monuments and several ecclesiastical objects are on display.

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Details

Founded: c. 1370
Category: Religious sites in Netherlands

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Albert van Veldhuisen (12 months ago)
Prachtige kerk met een prima akoestiek!!
Patrick Elich (13 months ago)
Mooie kerktoren die je kan beklimmen met geweldig uitzicht over bergen op zoom en omgeving
John Voets (13 months ago)
Het was gezellig druk, naar het geluid uit de installatie was erbarmelijk slecht.
Pascal Hoevers (2 years ago)
Hele mooie kerk, bezocht tijdens de monumenten dag waarbij je helemaal op de toren mocht komen. Heel mooi uitzicht vanaf daar!
Kuroi PK (3 years ago)
I always disliked the fact that I have to pay to view a church.
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