According the legend, the Gertrudiskerk was founded the church in 654 by Saint Gertrude of Nivelles, abbess of the abbey in Nivelles. The older part of the church consisting of the towers, dates to around 1370. These were later incorporated in probably the 14th and 15th century when changes were made to the church. The current church building, completed in 1477 was designed by Evert Spoorwater. He devised a new chancel with chancel ambulatory and vaults in the ship style of the Brabantine Gothic.

In 1489 Anthonis submitted to Keldermans a design for a new church in the Late Gothic style. In spite of a constant lack of money, a new chancel and transept were realized. During the troubles of 1580 the church was plundered and thereafter used as a military warehouse. A cannonade by the French in 1747 left the church devastated. In 1750 rebuilding efforts started again, albeit with a more sober character. The church was 9 meters lower after being rebuilt.

In 1586 the church was arranged for reformed services. The new chancel and transept were completed and in 1698 were demolished. Thus only a small part remained of the second transept. Material was needed at this time for the construction of fortifications.

From 1586 to 1966 the reformed congregation had this building in possession. In 1747 the building burned down after the bombardment by the French. Rebuilding took place using Protestant funds and Protestant stones. The reformed congregation retained control through the 1950s and 1960s and people began to regret that more and more. It appeared an impossible task to maintain such a large building. In 1966 the church was transferred to the municipality so the government could restore the building.

New misfortune struck the church again in 1972 when a fire broke out. The whole interior including the 18th century pipe organ by Louis Delhaye II was lost. In the 1980s restoration started anew. In 1987, the church was again inaugurated by the bishop of Breda.

Engraving by Erasmus Quellinus and Richard Collin of the Tomb of Willem van der Rijt and Judith van Aeswyn, 1641Among the interior features are a stained glass window honoring Saint Gertrudis, two pulpits, three Flemish confessionals and an Ibach pipe organ from 1863. Also some sepulchral monuments and several ecclesiastical objects are on display.

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Details

Founded: c. 1370
Category: Religious sites in Netherlands

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Aleksandrs (12 months ago)
Nice place
Leandi Jane Van Staden (21 months ago)
Rich in history and a very big beautiful church, the whole Markiezhof is beautiful. It's also very nice that they decorat it with Carnival time.
Eric Hall (2 years ago)
This place is nice! And the 2 gentlemen who work here are very knowledgeable and passionate about the history of this place. If you have time please stop in. It was wonderful.
John Berger (2 years ago)
What a beautiful cathedral. The history is so well preserved. We encountered a couple of local guides who were kind enough to show us through the building. So much history.
Albert van Veldhuisen (2 years ago)
Prachtige kerk met een prima akoestiek!!
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