Maria Magdalenakerk

Goes, Netherlands

The Grote (Great) or Maria Magdalenakerk is a late-Gothic cruciform basilica replaced an earlier church built in the 12th century which probably stood at the location of the nave of the current church. In the 15th century, when Goes transformed from a village into a town, the church was extended to the east. Between 1455 and 1470 the choir was rebuilt. Originally a hall-choir seems to have been intended, consisting of three equally high and wide aisles. Instead a basilican choir was built, but with three almost equal apses closing each of the three aisles. The transept was completed in 1506.

In 1618 a fire destroyed much of the church. The nave was rebuilt in Gothic style between 1619 and 1621. This choice of style is a bit remarkable considering the fact that the church had been in protestant hands since 1578. An architect from Antwerpen, Marcus Antonius, designed the new five-aisled nave, resulting in a church in Brabantine Gothic style. Natural stone was used for the clerestorey while a combination of brick and natural stone was used for the side-aisles and facade. As traces in the western walls of the transept seem to show, the previous nave had probably been wider than the current one. In 1620 a steeple was placed on the crossing.

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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Religious sites in Netherlands

More Information

www.archimon.nl

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

J.J.A. de Muijnck (2 years ago)
Een prachtige kerk om er te zijn.
Petra Tramper (3 years ago)
Naar de gezellige markt van de Hoop geweest in een mooie, sfeervolle kerk. Een klein nadeel: de mooie reliëfversieringen op de grond zijn minder prettig voor mensen die minder goed ter been zijn.
William (3 years ago)
Mooie kerk in centrum van Goes. Geen spijt even binnen gelopen te zijn geweest. Zeker doen als je in Goed bent.
Robbert Northolt (3 years ago)
Super
Richard Corbett (3 years ago)
Marvelous airy and light building, feels bigger inside than appears from the outside
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