Museum of Fine Arts

Ghent, Belgium

The Museum of Fine Arts in Ghent, Belgium holds a large permanent collection of art from the Middle Ages until the mid-20th century. The collection focuses on Flemish Art (masterpieces from Hieronymus Bosch, Peter Paul Rubens and Anthony van Dyck) but also has several European - especially French - paintings. It also has a large amount of sculptures. The building was designed by city architect Charles van Rysselberghe around 1900.

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Address

Hofbouwlaan 25, Ghent, Belgium
See all sites in Ghent

Details

Founded: 1900
Category: Museums in Belgium

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Arnoud Gernaat (7 months ago)
Wonderful museum, with significant focus on late medieval and renaissance biblical paintings. Some of the more recent era works (paintings and statues) are absolutely stunning, possibly up there with the best I’ve ever seen.
Calypso Magyar (8 months ago)
Excellent art museum. Lots of variety of works, so there will be something for pretty much everyone. Some parts were closed but they told us ahead of time and it was a pretty big museum so didn’t feel like we were cut short at all.
Peter Simon (9 months ago)
Bit out of the city centre but in a lovely park. Large collection of art ranging from the Flemish primitive to realist and surrealist masterpieces. Lovely audio guide. The building is spacious and easy to get lost in. The tour is about 2 hours long.
Alan Powner (9 months ago)
Very good. Some old masters, modern, surrealism & weird. Like all art museums not enough time to look at all fully if just visiting the city. Highly recommend.
Nathan Severeijns (3 years ago)
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