Middelburg Abbey Church

Middelburg, Netherlands

The Premonstratensian abbey in Middelburg was founded in 1127. Most of the buildings were destroyed by fire in 1492 and 1568. Today there are two adjacent churches, Koorkerk and Nieuwe Kerk. The Nieuwe Kerk dates from the 16th century, with the nearby Koorkerk abbey church dating from the 14th century. The octagonal tower, known as Lange Jan (Tall John), also originally dating from the 14th century but unfortunately has burned down several times. Its 91m height dominates the city but is difficult to photograph because of the surrounding buildings.

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Founded: 1127
Category: Religious sites in Netherlands

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Julian G. (14 months ago)
Nice church
Eugen Safin (15 months ago)
Very impressive - we didn't climb up though.
Klaas van Beurden (19 months ago)
Nice climb, good price, great view!
Jordan (2 years ago)
Beautiful place to visit - view is lovely! The stairs are extremely small so if you have a fear of heights or small spaces be wary. If you love old architecture and history it's a lovely experience. Go on the hour or half hour and you can get to hear the carillon (bells).
Mario Emmink (2 years ago)
Stabding fimm and tall
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