St Nicholas' Church

Ghent, Belgium

St. Nicholas' Church is one of the oldest and most prominent landmarks in Ghent. Begun in the early 13th century as a replacement for an earlier Romanesque church, construction continued through the rest of the century in the local Scheldt Gothic style (named after the nearby river). Typical of this style is the use of blue-gray stone from the Tournai area, the single large tower above the crossing, and the slender turrets at the building's corners.

Built in the old trade center of Ghent next to the bustling Korenmarkt (Wheat Market), St. Nicholas' Church was popular with the guilds whose members carried out their business nearby. The guilds had their own chapels which were added to the sides of the church in the 14th and 15th centuries.

The central tower, which was funded in part by the city, served as an observation post and carried the town bells until the neighboring belfry of Ghent was built. These two towers, along with the Saint Bavo Cathedral, still define the famous medieval skyline of the city center. One of the treasures of the church is its organ, produced by the famous French organ builder Aristide Cavaillé-Coll.

The building gradually deteriorated through the centuries, to a degree that threatened its stability. Cracks were overlaid with plaster, windows were bricked up to reinforce the walls, and in the 18th century, little houses and shops were built up against the dilapidated facades. Interest in the church as a historical monument arose around 1840, and at the turn of the 20th century major restoration plans emerged. The houses alongside the church were demolished and much renovation work has been carried out since then.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Belgium

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Wouter Koster (13 months ago)
Nice church, I hope that great organ will be playable
Jack Fisher (14 months ago)
This is a stunning location to sit and enjoy some of the more quiet, areas of Ghent. As Ghent is a city we have returned to multiple times now; this church and the surrounding area has become a highlight due its relaxed aire and local very affordable bars, where you can sit and enjoy some great value belgian beers in the beautiful summer sun. The area often fills with surrounding market stalls and over the years has become ever more slightly developed. The Park up the road is also another great spot to relax and let the kids expel some energy, I remember there also being a urinal here and public toilets facilites near by.
ram pradeep (2 years ago)
Beautiful church. Only a small portion is allowed for visitors but still worth a quick isit. We can see all of the interior beauty of church in maximum of 20 mins
Musa GÜLEÇ (2 years ago)
One of the best spots of Belgium. You should not miss to see this gorgeous town day and night.
Gordon Price (2 years ago)
Lovely old church. Great organ was being played when we were there which was great to hear.
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