St. Walburgis Church

Zutphen, Netherlands

The largest and oldest church of the Zutphen is the St. Walburgis (Saint Walpurga) church, which originally dates from the 11th century. The present Gothic building contains monuments of the former counts of Zutphen, a 14th-century candelabrum, an elaborate copper font (1527), and a monument to the Van Heeckeren family (1700).

The chapter-house of library contains a pre-Reformation library which includes some valuable manuscripts andincunabula. It is considered one of only 5 remaining medieval libraries in Europe (the other 4 being in England and Italy). The old books are still chained to their ancient wooden desk, a habit of centuries ago, dating from the times when the library was a 'public library' and the chains prevented the books from being stolen.

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Founded: 11th century
Category: Religious sites in Netherlands

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dion Morita (2 years ago)
I didn't go inside due to covid. But on the other hand, if you ever get lost when your battery died, it is a good landmark. Also a very beautiful building.
Tobrze Tobrze (2 years ago)
Great gothic architecture.
Marin Senteria (3 years ago)
Really beautiful church with library and tower with a thousand years of history attached to it. Definately worth visiting if you have an affinity for history
PRINSEZA PHENG (3 years ago)
Its really amazing to see those walls and arts inside and outside the church. You can see the whole city of zutphen from the top of church and that's wonderful.
Pinaki Ghosh (3 years ago)
Very elegant design - they often have exhibitions
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