St. Walburgis Church

Zutphen, Netherlands

The largest and oldest church of the Zutphen is the St. Walburgis (Saint Walpurga) church, which originally dates from the 11th century. The present Gothic building contains monuments of the former counts of Zutphen, a 14th-century candelabrum, an elaborate copper font (1527), and a monument to the Van Heeckeren family (1700).

The chapter-house of library contains a pre-Reformation library which includes some valuable manuscripts andincunabula. It is considered one of only 5 remaining medieval libraries in Europe (the other 4 being in England and Italy). The old books are still chained to their ancient wooden desk, a habit of centuries ago, dating from the times when the library was a 'public library' and the chains prevented the books from being stolen.

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Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Religious sites in Netherlands

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Frank Gubbels (18 months ago)
Heel mooie kerk. De Librije in de kerk is heel bijzonder.
Marleen Maas (2 years ago)
Prachtige kerk. Bezoek ook de Librije; Met een gids. Zeer de moeite waard.
ton Meuwissen (2 years ago)
Kom er alleen voor de World Press Photo tentoonstelling. Gebouw is wel mooi om te bezichtigen. Toren beklimmen is mogelijk.
Heleen Raes (2 years ago)
Beautiful church that’s definitely worth a visit! Income is free.
Stadswandelingen Gilde Zutphen (2 years ago)
Bijzondere kerk en Librije : de bibliotheek uit 1567
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