St. Michael's Church

Zwolle, Netherlands

St. Michael's Church in Zwolle was first time mentioned in 765 AD and the Romanesque church was erected around 1200. The current three-aisled church was erected between 1406-1466. The massive tower collapsed in 1682. The church contains a richly carved pulpit, the work of Adam Straes van Weilborch (about 1620), some good carving and an exquisite organ (1721).

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Founded: 1406-1466
Category: Religious sites in Netherlands

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kevin James van Duuren (2 years ago)
Beautiful place to have a coffee
Naga kumar (2 years ago)
Great architecture! Has a store inside the Church which sells pictures, paintings, books and many other things. Has magnificent paintings mounted on the wall inside which also includes both Dutch and English explanation of the paintings. The paintings cover range of gripping topics from war, poverty, family loss, crime and racism etc. The entry into the Church is free and products sold are all reasonably priced!
Benniarto Wiguna (2 years ago)
We had dinner group in this church, it was amazing dinner
Erik van der Velden (2 years ago)
A bit of an austere building, which accentuates the space. A nice organ as well.
Sam H (2 years ago)
A marvelous place to visit. A really beautiful church. Also you can find a book market inside.
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