Modrý Kamen Castle

Modrý Kameň, Slovakia

The name of the Modrý Kameň town was first mentioned as Keykkw ('Blue rock') in 1290. Ruins of the Modrý Kameň castle stand on a rock pinnacle above the town. The castle was built in the second half of the 13th century by the ancestors of the Balassa noble family. They had to recapture the castle from sons of Casimir of the Hunt-Poznan clan by a siege in 1290. The castle was captured by Ottoman troops in 1576, because its guard fled when they heard the approaching Ottomans.

The castle was given up and subsequently destroyed by Ottoman troops in 1593. It was restored between 1609 and 1612 by Sigismund Balassa. The castle was ravaged many times during the 17th century, so it became ruined and abandoned. The Balassa family built a new Baroque mansion house on the side of castle hill in the early 18th century; stones of the former castle were used in the mansion building operations. The last member of the Balassa noble family died in 1899. After the demise of the Balassa family, the Almásy noble family became the proprietors of castle Modrý Kameň. They sold the demesne to the Czechoslovakian state in 1923.

Now the manor house contains the Museum of Puppets and Toys, the only one of its kind in Slovakia. Visitors can see a permanent exhibition 'From the Life of Dwarfs'. The historical exhibition of dentist technology of the Slovak Chamber of Dentist installed here is unique in central Europe. Apart from exhibitions, several interestingevents and festivals are organized at the Castle.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Slovakia

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Daniel Pikan (10 months ago)
Beatiful castle in the middle of Slovakia. Fortrees arround are beatiful. Velky Krtis is relative cheap Town (food and accomondation).
jeroen verschelling (11 months ago)
Only visited the castle ruins, not the exhibition. Nice view from the castle.
M XXX (17 months ago)
This is a message for Gabi Sz. Do me a favor and talk to your gaverment to have sighns in English in your capital city of Budapest. I went to do Zoo in Budapest and found no English at all except Hungarian , and that was the same issue in every museum in Budapest. So please do not expect to have English/ Hungarian sighns in village of 300 people somewhere in the middle of nowhere. Times are gone long time ago and this is Slovakia now. As I don't find Slovak language in Hungary nor English.
Gabi Sz (18 months ago)
I went to the castle some days ago with my foreign visitors. I was shocked by the cold welcome - although I was speaking English not Hungarian... And I feel sorry that after all these years there is still tension and I should need to hide the fact that I am Hungarian. I also find it weird that there was almost no Hungarian descriptions in a historical Hungarian castle... We are in the EU in the 21st century so it would be useful to update the exhibitions - the same applies to the Hungarian side. This trip to the castle made me very sad and disappointed. Such a pity - both countries could benefit a lot from our interesting history and amazing nature.
Ctibor Hlavina (2 years ago)
Come to visit and you'll love it too...
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