Teisko church was completed in 1788, but it was inaugurated and taken into use in August 1787 while the construction work was still incomplete. This was necessary due to the poor condition of the previous church. The bell-tower was made ten years later by Åkerblom.

The basic form of the church is a cross with sloped inside angles. Of the many repairs performed on this wood-framed church, the overall look of the building has been most affected by the modification of the size and shape of its windows in 1842, as well as by the interior renovation work in 1906.

When Teisko joined the Tampere Federation of Evangelical Lutheran Parishes in 1972, the urban parishes were supplemented with a traditional rural parish. Located by Lake Kirkkojärvi and surrounded by a cemetery, the church forms a harmonious whole and an impressive monument to Finnish architecture and cultural scenery.

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Details

Founded: 1788
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: The Age of Enlightenment (Finland)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tarja Kohola (11 months ago)
Wonderful old-fashioned wooden church! The most important thing, however, is the word that is proclaimed there!
Mirja Viitanen (15 months ago)
Beautiful old church.
Ritta Bremer-Wiik (15 months ago)
Well maintained church and surroundings!
Jartsa (16 months ago)
Beautiful church by the lake. Worth a look. Awesome tile roof
jonne korhonen (2 years ago)
Beautiful old church and beautiful and well-kept cemetery
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