Hrusov Castle Ruins

Topoľčianky, Slovakia

The origins of Hrušov castle are not known, but it was probably built after the invasion of Tatars around 1253. From 1321 to 1344 it belonged to the family Levické and then became a royal property. In 1347 King Louis I of Hungary gave it to the governor Hrušov. The castle was destroyed by the Imperial army in 1708 and is in decay since then. However, its surviving walls induce a romantic atmosphere and provide a nice panoramic view.

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Topoľčianky, Slovakia
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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Ruins in Slovakia

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Stephen Young (2 years ago)
If you like old castles you'll like it and the views are amazing
Tomáš Hujčák (2 years ago)
Perfect work on this ruin.
Imre Pál (2 years ago)
Beautiful panorama, history only in local language aviable
Lubos Forro (2 years ago)
Very nice place
Martin Atalovic (2 years ago)
Very beautiful castle that is being saved by local communities and authorities. It can get quite busy and can be easily approached from more directions. The castle is partially rebuild and few of the walls have been saved. Still, there is a lot to do in saving the heritage.
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