St. Christopher's Cathedral

Roermond, Netherlands

In 1410 St.Christopher's church was moved to the market square, inside the new town wall. The church was badly damated during the Second World War. The tower was one day before the liberation blown up by the Germans and rebuilt after the war in modified form. On 13 April 1992 caused an earthquake in Roermond for significant damage.

On top is a huge statue of St. Christopher watching over Roermond. Today the cathedral is the main church of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Roermond.

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1410
Category: Religious sites in Netherlands

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Justin Duncan (20 months ago)
Had the privilege of visiting this cathedral when we visited Roermond.
Christopher Roche (2 years ago)
Was interesting to visit this Cathedral. Admission was free and was made to feel welcome. I wish I could have spent longer and get more information on the history.
Rasmus (2 years ago)
Interesting cathedral with beautiful artwork. The English-speaking guide was very friendly and willing to tell about the church. Also surprisingly child-friendly for a church as the guides were very patient and were not bothered when our two children made noise.
Mariusz Kupczak (3 years ago)
Really great, but why id it opened only for 3 hours per day (2-5 pm)....
Ricardo Liberato (4 years ago)
Beautifully kept and monumental.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Bamberg Historic City Centre

Bamberg is located in Upper Franconia on the river Regnitz close to its confluence with the river Main. Its historic city center is a listed UNESCO world heritage site.

Bamberg is a good example of a central European town with a basically early medieval plan and many surviving ecclesiastical and secular buildings of the medieval period. When Henry II, Duke of Bavaria, became King of Germany in 1007 he made Bamberg the seat of a bishopric, intended to become a 'second Rome'. Of particular interest is the way in which the present town illustrates the link between agriculture (market gardens and vineyards) and the urban distribution centre.

From the 10th century onwards, Bamberg became an important link with the Slav peoples, especially those of Poland and Pomerania. During its period of greatest prosperity, from the 12th century onwards, the architecture of this town strongly influenced northern Germany and Hungary. In the late 18th century Bamberg was the centre of the Enlightenment in southern Germany, with eminent philosophers and writers such as Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel and E.T.A. Hoffmann living there.

Bamberg extends over seven hills, each crowned by a beautiful church. This has led to Bamberg being called the 'Franconian Rome'.