Põltsamaa Castle

Põltsamaa, Estonia

The construction of Põltsamaa Castle was started in 1272. Between 1570 and 1578 it was the residence of Livonia's King Magnus. Repeatedly pillages, the castle was rebuilt by Woldemar Johann von Lauw in 1770 as a grand rococo-style palace. The castle, and the church built into its cannon tower, burnt down in 1941.

Põltsamaa St. Nicholas' Church was built from 1632 to 1633 on the site of earlier buildings. The nave was built on the 13th century gate buildings and the sanctuary on the 15th century cannon tower. The church was restored by 1952, and the castle ruins came under preservation during the 1970s.

Today the round courtyard holds a tourist information point and several museums including Põltsamaa Museum and a wine cellar with a food museum. There are also an art gallery, restaurant, handicraft and other workshops.

References: VisitEstonia, Aviastar.org

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Details

Founded: 1272
Category: Castles and fortifications in Estonia
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

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User Reviews

Ljudmila Barsukova (4 years ago)
Спокойно, приятно погулять и зайти в маленький музей и дегустационный зал.
Jarno Ersta (4 years ago)
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