St. John's Church

Viljandi, Estonia

The church of St. John (Jaani) was originally part of the Fransiscan abbey built in 1466-1472. The abbey was destroyed in 1560 and the church was restored in the beginning of the 17th century. Still functioning after the Second World War, it was closed in 1950 and turned into a warehouse. It was consecrated again in 1992 and is now often used as a concert venue.

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Address

Pikk 6, Viljandi, Estonia
See all sites in Viljandi

Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Religious sites in Estonia
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

More Information

www.visitestonia.com

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

meriliis kiis (9 months ago)
Kylm ja kole koht
Katrin Jõgisaar (15 months ago)
Väga kena kirik.
Heiki Tomann (16 months ago)
Largest clock bell set in Estonia with 25 bells rings in the tower of Jaani Church.
Liina Ostumaa (2 years ago)
Very nice welcoming church
Sebastian Stotz (3 years ago)
Eine kleine nette Kirche, in der wir unsere beiden Jungs haben taufen lassen. Der Pfarrer war sehr offen und unterstützte wo er konnte.
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