Viljandi Castle

Viljandi, Estonia

Viljandi castle was one of the strongest castles in Livonia. The construction was started 1224 under Teutonic Order in place of a former hillfort. The crusaders of Sword Brethren conquered the hill fort at the place of later main castle in 1223. A year later, construction of stone fortifications started. Viljandi was chosen as the high seat of the order.

The convent house, a typical form of castle of Teutonic Knights, was erected late 13th – early 14th century. In the following centuries the castle was extended and fortified further. It was badly damaged in the Polish-Swedish wars in early 17th century and not repaired any more. In 18th century, the ruins were used for quarrying stones for construction work in Viljandi.

The first excavations in the castle were performed in 1878–1879. In recent decades, these have turned to almost yearly events. Currently the ruins form a popular resort area just outside of central Viljandi. An open-air stage is located in the former central courtyard.

Reference: Wikipedia

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Details

Founded: 1224
Category: Miscellaneous historic sites in Estonia
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

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4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Andra Kabanen (16 months ago)
By now all the rooms have been visited ? When you go, you will always be greeted by extremely friendly staff and perfectly thought-out rooms ? The solutions used in the rooms will be interesting to see who was able to come up with such things... only praises are enough! Powerful!
Michi Chiharu (2 years ago)
Amazing experience and nice workers
zzz 34 (3 years ago)
fantastic experience, visit now ...
meriliis kiis (5 years ago)
Mega fun koht?
Kaupo Leon (5 years ago)
Lahe seiklus kogemus.
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