Citadel of Lille

Lille, France

The Citadel of Lille is a pentagonal citadel built between 1667-1670. It is one of the most notable citadels designed by Sébastien Le Prestre de Vauban, the famous military engineer. It is remarkable for its size, the quality of the architecture, and the state of preservation today.

This 'Queen of Citadels' is the matrix of most citadels designed by Vauban. Established on the border of Flanders, it was part of a double-line of fortified towns between Gravelines, Dunkirk and Maubeuge-Rocroi. It delineated the famous Pré Carré ('square field') conceived by Vauban comprising 28 fortified cities. From Lille, Vauban supervised the construction of the many citadels and canals of the North, which controlled the border between France and Belgium.

Lille was taken from Spain by French troops in August 1667, and Louis XIV immediately ordered the construction of a fortress. Louis Nicolas de Clerville and Vauban proposed plans. Vauban are those which were chosen by the King. Work was started in 1668 under the direction of Lille"s master mason Simon Vollant. In 1671, the citadel was operational while Vauban continued to shape the city by constructing, a few steps away, a new neighborhood around the Rue Royale. The design of the citadel follows a simple but very effective idea: not one of its walls can be approached by the enemy without that being under fire from a nearby wall.

The citadel was constructed to the west of the city on marshland at the junction of the rivers Deûle and Bucquet. This allowed the use of swamp water and mud as a natural defense to make conditions more difficult for any possible enemy besieging the citadel. Through a system of locks and water gates, 1,700 hectares around the citadel could be flooded to a depth of 55 cm. A wide esplanade interrupted the plans, connecting the fort to the city. In 1750, a canal along the esplanade was drilled according to the plans drawn up by Vauban.

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Address

Avenue du 43E Ri, Lille, France
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Details

Founded: 1667-1670
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Daniel Mocarski (3 years ago)
Honesty nothing special - just walls, runners and dog walkers around.
Chean Yong (4 years ago)
The citadel itself is ok. The park is nice for a jog not really a walk as a loop around the citadel is at least 2 km with monotonous landscaping. There was also a cheesy funfair whilst i was there and lots of drunk but friendly people at night. Feels like an urban park/wooded area that's been through phases of neglect and care.
木子 (4 years ago)
Green space with tracks. Lots of people running, jogging and walking. Nothing special as the citadel is closed. The funfair might be interesting for kids though.
Martin Smith (4 years ago)
The citadel fortifications are impressive and the park is a great place to take a walk. I wish it was open for tours though, I'd really like to see inside.
Fernando Jiménez Gallardo (5 years ago)
Nice place to have a walk around. A little paradise of nature and history in Lille. Unfortunately it wasn't possible for me and my friends to get inside of the Citadel
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