Musée de l'Orangerie

Paris, France

The Musée de l'Orangerie is an art gallery of impressionist and post-impressionist paintings. Though most famous for being the permanent home for eight Water Lilies murals by Claude Monet, the museum also contains works by Paul Cézanne, Henri Matisse, Amedeo Modigliani, Pablo Picasso, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Henri Rousseau, Alfred Sisley, Chaim Soutine, and Maurice Utrillo, among others.

the Orangerie was originally built in 1852 by the architect Firmin Bourgeois and completed by his successor, Ludovico Visconti, to shelter the orange trees of the garden of the Tuileries. Used by the Third Republic in the nineteenth century as deposit for goods, an examination room, and place of lodging for mobilized soldiers, it also served to house sporting, musical, and patriotic events. Additionally, it was a place to display exhibitions of industry, animals, plants, as well as rare displays of painting.

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Details

Founded: 1852
Category: Museums in France

More Information

www.musee-orangerie.fr

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Paul Evans (2 years ago)
Absolutely fantastic gallery in the shadows of the huge iconic museums. Make a visit, if not just to see Monet's waterlilies in the two oval rooms. Arrive when it opens to ensure you can stand back and admire them from every angle, near and far - they're incredible! The gallery's collection has many other fantastic works and temporary exhibitions.
Chandni Ghosh (2 years ago)
I'm so happy to visit this museum. It's like dreams come true. Can spend hours before Monet's Willow tree and Lily pond. So beautiful. Huge display. Except Monet's work, there are so many world famous paintings. art enthusiasts can get glimpse of work of PierreAuguste Renoir and Paul Cezanne.
Lorenzo (2 years ago)
After what I admit no research, I was expecting it to be focused only on Monet. I was positively surprised of the amount of well known artists they had in the lower floor. Varying from impressionists, fauve and cubists (Cezanne, Picasso, Modigliani..) Really enjoyed it and the audio guide (for a 5€ fee) was worth it to give the paintings their context. A lot of the story of the artists is described on the panels next to their paintings.
Antonio Valenzuela (2 years ago)
Meditative and beautiful, not overwhelming like the Louvre can be. Everything as advertised, well set up, tastefully presented. I recommend the Orsay-Orangerie combined ticket as it'll save you a bit of money and both museums are great experiences.
Theresa Tran (3 years ago)
Nice little museum in the park with some beautiful pieces of art. Today my husband and I enjoyed a couple hours inside on a rainy day. No line, €9 a person to enter. They do have a coat check but you could also just hold onto your things. Two main floors of art with a small cafe and gift shop in between. The lowest floor has a collection from various artists. Informative plaques in French and English make it really easy to know about the artists featured. Audio guides are €5. On the top floor you can find Monet’s water lilies. We were lucky enough to see both the rooms. Midway through seeing the second room they asked everyone to leave and blocked off the room. Not sure why but seemed unfortunate since Monet’s Waterlilies is what many people look forward to seeing. Very manageable museum that doesn’t feel too over whelming.
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