Saint-Eustache

Paris, France

The Church of St Eustace was built between 1532-1632. St Eustace's is considered a masterpiece of late Gothic architecture. The church’s reputation was strong enough of the time for it to be chosen as the location for a young Louis XIV to receive communion. Mozart also chose the sanctuary as the location for his mother’s funeral. Among those baptised here as children were Richelieu, Jeanne-Antoinette Poisson, future Madame de Pompadour and Molière, who was also married here in the 17th century. The last rites for Anne of Austria, Turenne and Mirabeau were pronounced within its walls. Marie de Gournay is buried there.

The origins of Saint Eustache date back to 13th century. The church became a parish church in 1223, thanks to a man named Jean Alais who achieved this by taxing the baskets of fish sold nearby, as granted by King Philip Augustus. To thank such divine generosity, Alais constructed a chapel dedicated to Sainte-Agnès, a Roman martyr. The construction of the current church began in 1532, the work not being finally completed until 1637. The name of the church refers to Saint Eustace, a Roman general of the second century AD who was burned, along with his family, for converting to Christianity, and it is believed that it was the transfer of a relic of Saint Eustache from the Abbey to Saint-Denis to the Church of Saint Eustache which resulted in its naming. Jeanne Baptiste d'Albert de Luynes was baptised here.

According to tourist literature on-site, during the French Revolution the church, like most churches in Paris, was desecrated, looted, and used for a time as a barn. The church was restored after the Revolution had run its course and remains in use today. Several impressive paintings by Rubens remain in the church today. Each summer, organ concerts commemorate the premieres of Berlioz’s Te Deum and Liszt’s Christus here in 1886.

The church is an example of a Gothic structure clothed in Renaissance detail. The church is relatively short in length at 105m, but its interior is 33.45m high to the vaulting. At the main façade, the left tower has been completed in Renaissance style, while the right tower remains a stump. The front and rear aspects provide a remarkable contrast between the comparatively sober classical front and the exuberant rear, which integrates Gothic forms and organization with Classical details. The L'écoute sculpture by Henri de Miller appears outside the church, to the south. A Keith Haring sculpture stands in a chapel of the church.

The Chapel of the Virgin was built in 1640 and restored from 1801 to 1804. It was inaugurated by Pius VII on the 22nd of December, 1804 when he came to Paris for the coronation of Napoleon. The apse chapel, with a ribbed cul-de-four vault, has at its centre a sculpture of the Virgin and Child of Jean-Baptiste Pigalle that the painter Thomas Couture highlighted by three large paintings.

With 8,000 pipes, the organ is reputed to be the largest pipe organ in France, surpassing the organs of Saint Sulpice and Notre Dame de Paris. The organ originally constructed by P.-A. Ducroquet was powerful enough for the premiere of Hector Berlioz' titanic Te Deum to be performed at St-Eustache in 1855.

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Address

Rue du Jour 2, Paris, France
See all sites in Paris

Details

Founded: 1532-1632
Category: Religious sites in France

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Claude de Lieven (5 months ago)
Paris France, second Paris visited church after Notre Dame. Has been clean on the outside but still needs lots of renovations inside. There's paintings inside that once renovated will be magnificent. The stained windows are exquisite. When in Paris a must to see and, no queues and fees to pay as for Notre Dame. Métro les Halles.
Laury Bourgeois (6 months ago)
All time favorite eglise in Paris. A must every be visit and a candle for St. Therese!
Clemens van den Berg (6 months ago)
Easily one of the most beautiful churches in Paris, steeped in a rich history. Go there on a Sunday afternoon to hear the magnificent organ being played, usually by young and excellent musician-scholars, in a free recital at 5PM. The intense sound waves from the lowest registers will viscerally shake you in your chairs, as if a light earthquake happens underneath you. The exterior is equally photogenic, especially in spring when you can frame it in the abundance of blossoming trees and flowers around.
Joan Poh (10 months ago)
Absolutely well worth a visit. It's not a tourist site. This church still functions as a church, so visitors are expected to be quiet and respect the surroundings. Nevertheless, walk in and be amazed and stunned by the beautiful Gothic art contained within.
Cristina Vasilenco (13 months ago)
Beautiful Cathedral. Place is full of history. Any detail of interior design elements and exterior is a piece of art. Amazing Chagall windows, lots of statues made out of marble, nice dark wooden details in furniture. Must visit place and listen organ play. Organ music and atmosphere make to feel Spirit of the place. Admission is free( u can do your own donation if would like). Photography allow without flashlight.
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