The Church of Saint-Roch is a late Baroque church built between 1653 and 1740. In 1521, the tradesman Jean Dinocheau had a chapel built on the outskirts of Paris, which he dedicated to Saint Susanna. In 1577, his nephew Etienne Dinocheau had it extended into a larger church. In 1629, it became the parish church and thereafter underwent further work. The first stone of the church of Saint-Roch was laid by Louis XIV in 1653, accompanied by his mother Anne of Austria. Originally designed by Jacques Lemercier, the building's construction was halted in 1660 and was resumed in 1701 under the direction of architect Jacques Hardouin-Mansart, brother of the better-known Jules Hardouin-Mansart. Work was finally completed in 1754.

At the time of the French Revolution, the church of Saint-Roch was often at the centre of events and was the scene of many shootings which have left their mark on the façade. 13 Vendémiaire was one such occasion, this was pivotal in the rise of Napoleon. It was not only the outside of the church that was damaged. During the Revolution it was ransacked, and many works of art were stolen or destroyed. Amongst the missing paintings was one of Dinocheau, a generous donor, who built the first church on this spot.

The church is organized as a series of chapels. One of them is dedicated to Saint Susanna in memory of the church which used to stand in its place. Accordingly, there is a mural painting above the altar, showing Saint Susanna fleeing her attackers, and looking up to the heavens for the help of God. The church is also notable as a result of the marriage there of the Marquis de Sade on May 17, 1763.

Notable tombs in the church included those of Denis Diderot, the Baron d'Holbach, Henri de Lorraine-Harcourt, Pierre Corneille, André le Nôtre, Marie Anne de Bourbon (daughter of Louis XIV) and Marie-Thérèse Rodet Geoffrin.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1653
Category: Religious sites in France

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Claude Worbster (3 years ago)
Beautiful.
Emely PAsumbal (4 years ago)
We stumbled upon this 17th century baroque church while waiting for our Giverny trip. After short prayers, we marveled at the murals and sculptures which, though not famous, were as beautiful and as historical as those in Notre Dame. And then... and then... suddenly we heard celestial voices seemingly emanating from its walls (as the church seemed empty without us).
Omar El Alami (4 years ago)
Stumbled onto this church by accident. Had no idea what it would unfold once entered, and waw it did not disappoint. After literally wandering into here, I sat for a good while just taking in the astonishing architecture, then walked around to fully take in the whole place. Just jaw-dropping dedication and investment. Would totally recommend it to anyone in the area.
Norah G (4 years ago)
An awe-inspiring beautiful church with lots to offer .. whether you're a religious person or simply spiritual, like myself
Yi Jian (6 years ago)
What a lovely place to visit in Paris. Probably not in many tourist guides so it was quiet Lovely to photograph but I didn't break my rule of photographing inside religious sites. Left a nice donation.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Gruyères Castle

The Castle of Gruyères is one of the most famous in Switzerland. It was built between 1270 and 1282, following the typical square plan of the fortifications in Savoy. It was the property of the Counts of Gruyères until the bankruptcy of the Count Michel in 1554. His creditors the cantons of Fribourg and Bern shared his earldom. From 1555 to 1798 the castle became residence to the bailiffs and then to the prefects sent by Fribourg.

In 1849 the castle was sold to the Bovy and Balland families, who used the castle as their summer residency and restored it. The castle was then bought back by the canton of Fribourg in 1938, made into a museum and opened to the public. Since 1993, a foundation ensures the conservation as well as the highlighting of the building and the art collection.

The castle is the home of three capes of the Order of the Golden Fleece. They were part of the war booty captured by the Swiss Confederates (which included troops from Gruyères) at the Battle of Morat against Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy in 1476. As Charles the Bold was celebrating the anniversary of his father's death, one of the capes is a black velvet sacerdotal vestment with Philip the Good's emblem sewn into it.

A collection of landscapes by 19th century artists Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, Barthélemy Menn and others are on display in the castle.