St-Gervais-et-St-Protais Church

Paris, France

Beginning in 1653, the St-Gervais-et-St-Protais church employed and sheltered the Couperin family, one of the most famous dynasties of French musicians, for more than two centuries. On one side of the church, the home of the famous harpsichordists, organists, and composers still stands, with a plaque commemorating the Couperins' tenure in this place. The organ used by Louis and François Couperin still exists today inside the church. Built by the most famous organ builders of the time — François-Henri Clicquot, Louis-Alexandre Clicquot, and Robert Clicquot — it is a fine example of the French baroque style.

This church site is one of the oldest in Paris. Its existence at this place is mentioned as early as the fourth century. Dedicated to Gervasius and Protasius, the church was formerly the seat of the powerful brotherhood of wine merchants. It assumed its present appearance in the 16th century. Its façade was completed much later, however, about 1620.

The present church was begun in the Gothic style in 1494, the chapels of the apse were finished in 1530 and the transept in 1578. The doorway of the church was built in 1616–1620 by Claude Monnard in the classical style. Between 1600 and 1628, a second row of chapels was built on the north side including the golden chapel ornamented with painted woodwork.

The church was refurbished to coincide with Pope John Paul II's second visit to Paris with the continued installation of a number of new stained glass windows (Claude Courageux, earlier work by Sylvie Gaudin.

One side of the church is skirted by the Rue François Miron, where two of the oldest medieval houses of Paris survive, at numbers 11 and 13. They date, most likely, from the 14th century. One can see the exposed wood of the half-timbered structures.

On 29 March 1918, a German shell, fired by the long-range 'Paris Gun', fell on the church, killing 88 people and wounding 68 others; the explosion collapsed the roof when a Good Friday service was in progress. This was the worst single incident involving a loss of civilian lives during the German bombardment of Paris in 1918. Among those killed was Rose-Marie Ormond Andre-Michel, the niece and a favorite model of John Singer Sargent.

References:

Comments

Your name



Address

Rue des Barres 13, Paris, France
See all sites in Paris

Details

Founded: 16th century
Category: Religious sites in France

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mohammad Ayoub (7 months ago)
I found this church by chance while wandering around Paris. One of the things I liked most about the churches of Paris is the stained glass windows, painted in an attractive way. Apart from the churches that tourists visit most of the time, the Gothic-style church of Saint-Gervais-Saint-Brôté is worth a visit as it is located near the town hall. Construction of the church began in 1494, and it took about 150 years to build.
Alan Holmes (2 years ago)
Great Church to visit, architecture and art work is excellent. Very helpful lady in the church showing you the colourful reflections on the floor from the stain glassed windows and their religious interpretation (Thank You again) Always great places to visit for History, Architecture and Art.
Bob SYD (2 years ago)
Always spiritual place love it
Leticia Gonzalez (2 years ago)
I truly love and appreciate looking at all the churches in France. So much beauty in all the stained glass windows, wood work, paintings and sculptures. So much history! I highly recommend stop by and admire this beauty!? #Paris
maan Obed (3 years ago)
A very charming church, very beautiful, I recommend visiting it and enjoying the colors and lights , and The paintings are so beautiful
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Topography of Terror

The Topography of Terror (Topographie des Terrors) is an outdoor and indoor history museum. It is located on Niederkirchnerstrasse, formerly Prinz-Albrecht-Strasse, on the site of buildings which during the Nazi regime from 1933 to 1945 were the headquarters of the Gestapo and the SS, the principal instruments of repression during the Nazi era.

The buildings that housed the Gestapo and SS headquarters were largely destroyed by Allied bombing during early 1945 and the ruins demolished after the war. The boundary between the American and Soviet zones of occupation in Berlin ran along the Prinz-Albrecht-Strasse, so the street soon became a fortified boundary, and the Berlin Wall ran along the south side of the street, renamed Niederkirchnerstrasse, from 1961 to 1989. The wall here was never demolished.