Maasi Fortress Ruins

Saaremaa, Estonia

Maasi medieval fort-castle was built with the forced labour of islanders. That's how the ruling Liivi order punished indigenous inhabitants for the uprising, which had destroyed orders previous stronghold. Seaside fort-castle was undefeated until destroyed by Danes. The fortress was blown up in 1576 by the Danes in an attempt to forestall the Swedish invasion and nothing was done for the next 300 years. 8m walls that survived the destruction have become a landmark.

Reference: VisitEstonia

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Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Ruins in Estonia
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Martin Jambor (2 years ago)
Ruins of central building of castle. To that fun but worth seeing if you have 10 minutes :)
Povilas Petrauskas (2 years ago)
For those that find abandoned places fascinating this is a must to visit. Castle is located close to the sea, on top of a small hill with a beautiful park-like nature and combined it results in a wonderful view. You can walk on the upper part of ruins or go to explore the dungeons. Inside looks untouched, so you'll see exactly as it was before. Personally I enjoyed the sightings and recommend to take a short detour and see this wonderful piece of history.
Toomas Salumaa (2 years ago)
Ok spot for a quick drive through.
Kristjan Kinna (2 years ago)
Easy to get there. Not much to look. No fee for enterance. Good place to make camping stop for night.
Triinu Rains (2 years ago)
One of the few very well preserved older forts which the locals help keep up. We got a little tour from a lady who sold souvenires there, in Estonian. There's no ticket price, but it's nice to offer a little to help with the upkeep of the ruins.
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