Maasi Fortress Ruins

Saaremaa, Estonia

Maasi medieval fort-castle was built with the forced labour of islanders. That's how the ruling Liivi order punished indigenous inhabitants for the uprising, which had destroyed orders previous stronghold. Seaside fort-castle was undefeated until destroyed by Danes. The fortress was blown up in 1576 by the Danes in an attempt to forestall the Swedish invasion and nothing was done for the next 300 years. 8m walls that survived the destruction have become a landmark.

Reference: VisitEstonia

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Ruins in Estonia
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Martin Jambor (9 months ago)
Ruins of central building of castle. To that fun but worth seeing if you have 10 minutes :)
Povilas Petrauskas (12 months ago)
For those that find abandoned places fascinating this is a must to visit. Castle is located close to the sea, on top of a small hill with a beautiful park-like nature and combined it results in a wonderful view. You can walk on the upper part of ruins or go to explore the dungeons. Inside looks untouched, so you'll see exactly as it was before. Personally I enjoyed the sightings and recommend to take a short detour and see this wonderful piece of history.
Toomas Salumaa (13 months ago)
Ok spot for a quick drive through.
Kristjan Kinna (13 months ago)
Easy to get there. Not much to look. No fee for enterance. Good place to make camping stop for night.
Triinu Rains (13 months ago)
One of the few very well preserved older forts which the locals help keep up. We got a little tour from a lady who sold souvenires there, in Estonian. There's no ticket price, but it's nice to offer a little to help with the upkeep of the ruins.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Sirmione Castle

Sirmione castle was built near the end of the 12th century as part of a defensive network surrounding Verona. The castle was maintained and extended first as part of the Veronese protection against their rivals in Milan and later under the control of the Venetian inland empire. The massive fortress is totally surrounded by water and has an inner porch which houses a Roman and Medieval lapidary. From the drawbridge, a staircase leads to the walkways above the walls, providing a marvellous view of the harbour that once sheltered the Scaliger fleet. The doors were fitted with a variety of locking systems, including a drawbridge for horses, carriages and pedestrians, a metal grate and, more recently, double hinged doors. Venice conquered Sirmione in 1405, immediately adopting provisions to render the fortress even more secure, fortifying its outer walls and widening the harbour.

Thanks to its strategical geographical location as a border outpost, Sirmione became a crucial defence and control garrison for the ruling nobles, retaining this function until the 16th century, when its role was taken up by Peschiera del Garda.