Maasi Fortress Ruins

Saaremaa, Estonia

Maasi medieval fort-castle was built with the forced labour of islanders. That's how the ruling Liivi order punished indigenous inhabitants for the uprising, which had destroyed orders previous stronghold. Seaside fort-castle was undefeated until destroyed by Danes. The fortress was blown up in 1576 by the Danes in an attempt to forestall the Swedish invasion and nothing was done for the next 300 years. 8m walls that survived the destruction have become a landmark.

Reference: VisitEstonia

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Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Ruins in Estonia
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Виталий Павлюк (14 months ago)
Fascinating place. Well preserved ruins. You can buy some souvenirs nearby
Toomas Liivamägi (15 months ago)
When planning your trip to Saaremaa, be sure to add this place to your travel plan.
Elvis Kõll (15 months ago)
One of the most underrated places in Saaremaa to see. Really impressive ruins.
Giuseppe D'Alberti (17 months ago)
The ruins of an old castle from 1200. The basement has been restored and it is well illuminated by automatic lights. It is full of bird nests so don't get scared if you see them flying around. It has a huge potential with a swimmable bay in front of it but unfortunately the exteriors are not cured at all so it doesn't look good enough. If you are on the way stop by, it is totally worth it. If you have to cross the whole island maybe not, there are more interesting things.
marius sirgi (2 years ago)
Nice
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