Otepää Castle Ruins

Otepää, Estonia

Otepää castle hill is the site of an ancient stronghold. It is speculated that a fortified settlement may have existed there even before Christ. The first major extension works were initiated in the 11th and 12th century when the castle was at the crossroads of important trading routes. Herman I, the bishop of Tartu, established there the first stronghold of its diocese. A settlement, which was mainly populated by craftsmen and merchants, appeared around the bishop’s castle in the 13th century. The castle was the first known brick building in Estonia.

References: VisitEstonia, turismiweb.ee

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Ruins in Estonia
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ain Aart (22 months ago)
Mõnus asutus saab osta pileteid kuktuuri üritustele turismiinfot jne.
George On tour (2 years ago)
Otepaa Tourist Information Centre gives tourists free information about tourist sights, accommodation and catering, possibilites for active vacations, cultural events, guide services and transportation in Otepaa tourism region, Valgamaa and all over Estonia. Otepaa Tourist Information Centre also provides paid services: booking accommodation, ordering taxis, photocopying, scanning, using the computer. Otepaa Tourist Information Centre sells souvenirs and stamps.There's free WiFi at the Otepaa Tourist Information Centre. The rating goes for closing earlier, in any case you could have some leaflets outside the office for the tourists.
Merili Aasma (2 years ago)
Best place to start your journey for discovering Otepää & area.
Kristi Laur (2 years ago)
Väga sisukat infot sain kohalike vaatamisväärsuste ja külastamist väärivate kohtade osas!
Janno Kuuƨ (3 years ago)
Jagatakse teadlikku infot sõbralikud töötajad, aitäh.
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