Otepää Castle Ruins

Otepää, Estonia

Otepää castle hill is the site of an ancient stronghold. It is speculated that a fortified settlement may have existed there even before Christ. The first major extension works were initiated in the 11th and 12th century when the castle was at the crossroads of important trading routes. Herman I, the bishop of Tartu, established there the first stronghold of its diocese. A settlement, which was mainly populated by craftsmen and merchants, appeared around the bishop’s castle in the 13th century. The castle was the first known brick building in Estonia.

References: VisitEstonia, turismiweb.ee

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Miscellaneous historic sites in Estonia
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Trick Y (6 months ago)
Great welcome and valuable advice!
Rolands Zaremba (2 years ago)
Cool
Anu (2 years ago)
Entrance on the side of the town hall building. Information, souvenirs, an interactive exhibition about the history of the Estonian flag in a separate room.
Sergei (3 years ago)
Visitor center with a good souvenir shop. There is a room dedicated to the Estonian flag. The exposition introduces his history.
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