Tartu University

Tartu, Estonia

The University of Tartu was established by King Gustavus Adolphus of Sweden in 1632, thus being one of the oldest universities in Northern Europe. Over the centuries it has been closed down, moved to Tallinn and re-opened by Baltic Germans. After Estonia became independent in 1918, the University of Tartu has been an Estonian-language institution since 1919.

The main building of Tartu University is one of the most outstanding examples of classical architecture in Estonia. The main building was built in 1804-1809 according to university architect Johann Wilhelm Krause’s plans. The opening ceremony of the university’s main building took place on 3 July 1809. Since that day, all major university events are celebrated in the Main Hall. Because of superb acoustics many concerts are held here, and its spaciousness allows for conferences to be held. The hall was re-opened on 3 May 2002 following its last renovation

The university’s four museums, its Botanical Gardens, and sports facilities are, by and large, open to the general public. The University possesses some 150 buildings, 30 of which are outside of Tartu. 31 of its buildings decorate the city as architectural monuments. However, the current reforms include attempts to sell, or have the state co-sponsor, several of these buildings and monuments, as well as sports facilities, as they are not seen as part of the university's mission proper. At the same time, there are numerous recently constructed/renovated university buildings and student dormitories, such as the Technology Institute and the Biomedical Center.

Reference: Wikipedia, Tartu Tourism Information

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Address

Ülikooli 17, Tartu, Estonia
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Details

Founded: 1632
Category:
Historical period: Part of the Swedish Empire (Estonia)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Harjeel Zaigham (4 months ago)
I love this place
George On tour (5 months ago)
UT is Estonia's leading centre of research and training. It preserves the culture of the Estonian people and spearheads the country's reputation in research and provision of higher education. UT belongs to the top 1.2% of world's best universities. As Estonia's national university, UT stresses the importance of international co-operation and partnerships with reputable research universities all over the world. The robust research potential of the university is evidenced by the fact that the University of Tartu has been invited to join the Coimbra Group, a prestigious club of renowned research universities.
David Stankevich (6 months ago)
One of the best universities in the whole Baltic States. And it looks majestic at that.
Mahir Gulzar (10 months ago)
Best experience ever...
Erika Östman (2 years ago)
The University Area of Tartu is the most Beautiful with a view of one of Europes ancient places. Recommend a visit.
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