Zvolen Castle is a medieval well-preserved castle located on a hill near the center of Zvolen. The original seat of the region was above the confluence of Slatina and Hron rivers on a steep cliff in a castle from the 12th century, known today as Pustý hrad (meaning 'Deserted castle'). Its difficult access had consequence in relocation of the seat to the new-built Zvolen castle, which was ordered by Louis I the Great as a hunting residence of Hungarian kings. The future queen regnant Mary of Hungary and emperor Sigismund celebrated their wedding there in 1385.

Gothic architecture of the castle built between 1360 and 1382 was inspired by Italian castles of the fourteenth century. Italian masons also contributed to a Renaissance reconstruction in 1548. The last major reconstruction occurred in 1784, when the chapel was rebuilt into the Baroque style.

Zvolen castle was built by Louis I of Hungary, which built it like a gothic hunting castle. In his form was finished in 1382, when it was a witness of an engagement of his daughter Mary and Sigismund. John Jiskra of Brandýs, who became one of the most powerful commander in Hungary and this castle was one of his manors from 1440 to 1462. The castle was also often visited by king Matthias Corvinus with his wife Beatrice, who used this castle as a manor from 1490.

About 1500 was built up external fortification with four round bastions and entrance gate. In half of 16th century was built up another floor with embrasures and corner oriel towers. About 1590 was built up artillery bastion also.

The castle was rebuilt many times, but it retains its Renaissance look. The castle was nominated as a National culture monument for his historic, art and architecture values and it was reconstructed in the 1960s. The Slovak National Gallery has a seat in this castle now, where it presents its expositions.

Zvolen Castle hosts a regional branch of the Slovak National Gallery with an exposition of old European masters, including works by P. P. Rubens, Paolo Veronese, and William Hogarth. There is also a popular tea room located in the castle.

Every year The Zvolen Castle Plays are introduced to huge amount of visitors. Here you can see actors and theatres from Slovakia, but also from another countries. The castle also offered a rental of his King hall, Column hall and Knightly hall, which is useful for organizing concerts, receptions, wedding ceremonies, etc. Now you can also see a computer model of this castle, which was made as an academic project.

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Address

Nám. SNP 1, Zvolen, Slovakia
See all sites in Zvolen

Details

Founded: 1360-1382
Category: Castles and fortifications in Slovakia

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jeffrey Jones (10 months ago)
Amazing array of icons gathered from neighbouring countries and from Slovakia and, of course, Zvolen. Many of the exhibits date from the 14th and 15th century and some even earlier. Also here are fine artworks with some excellent portraiture on display.
Viktoria Takacs (12 months ago)
Nice castle, very good exhibition inside if you like religious art.
Nicolas Schaeffer (12 months ago)
Interesting museum, particularly the polychrome wood statues by a local master.
Daniel Šácha (14 months ago)
Amazing castle, cultural events of high quality.
Veronika Nagyová (16 months ago)
Really wonderful to place to go with your friends or family. You can see nice paintings there with descriptions to learn more. I recommend this place for everyone.
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