Šamorín Gothic church is composed of three naves. The eastern part of the church, an early Gothic holy cave, was constructed in the first half of the thirteenth century. Its outer walls bear traces of the late reconstruction. This, and the supporting pillars, may have been the work of Bratislava's mayor Alexander’s son Karol shortly after 1287. The holy cave was lit by five arched windows. Among these, only three east side windows are original, made in the first half of the 13th century. The two remaining windows on the south side were refurbished in the Gothic style in the 15th century, then in the Baroque style in the 18th century and, finally, enlarged in 1931.

After reconstruction around 1290, the whole church was decorated with painted figures, which were later covered but were revealed again during restoration. There are also paintings of standing Saints, a depiction of Holy Mary's death and Judging Jesus. The north side wing was built/rebuilt later, probably after some kind of a disaster, fire or possibly flood.

The organ case dates from the second half of the 19th century. The wooden gate on the outside of the north hall was made in 1844; the altar was made of red marble in 1904.

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Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Slovakia

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en.wikipedia.org

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Zsuzsanna Kontár (15 months ago)
I was at a wedding to congratulate.
Andrej Hromý (2 years ago)
It's beautiful
Carlo Sipos (2 years ago)
"GOD MY EARTH ... I GIVE MY SPIRIT" ....
Peter Trska (2 years ago)
Beautiful church.
Terike Paulik (2 years ago)
Often I get there if everything is fine !!!
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