Spyker Castle

Glowe, Germany

The Spyker (Spycker) Castle and estate is the oldest profane structure on the Baltic Sea island of Rügen. Spycker was first recorded in 1318. It belonged then to the Stralsund patrician family von Külpens. In 1344 a daughter from the House of von Külpen married the Jasmunds. As a result the Spyker branch of the von Jasmunds was founded which died without issue in 1648.

As a result of the Thirty Years' War, Pomerania, and hence Rügen, fell to Sweden under the Treaty of Westphalia in 1648. As a reward for his wartime services, Queen Christine of Sweden gave the now empty seat of Spycker in 1649 to the Swedish field marshal and later governor-general of Swedish Pomerania, Carl Gustav Wrangel. The castle, originally furnished with a defensive moat, was remodelled after 1650 into its present appearance as a Renaissance schloss and painted in Swedish Falu red, which was atypical of Rügen. Fully sculptured stucco ceilings, unique in the Baltic region, date to around 1652.

After the death of Carl Gustav Wrangel in 1676, the property passed to his daughter Eleanora-Sophia, wife of the Lord of Putbus. Eleanora-Sophia died in 1687, and the property went to the Swedish family of Brahe, with whom her older sister was connected by marriage. After its occupation by the Napoleonic troops in 1806/07 Spycker temporarily became the seat of the French governor of Rügen. In 1815, Rügen, which had hitherto been Swedish, was handed over to Prussia. Magnus Fredrik Brahe sold Spycker in 1817 and it came into the possession of Prince Wilhelm Malte I of Putbus.

Until the land reform in the Soviet Occupation Zone in 1945, the estate remained in the possession of the von Putbus family. In subsequent years, the castle was left to decay. From the 1960s until 1989, the East German trade union federation, FDGB, used the castle as a holiday home. Since 1990, the castle has been used as a hotel and, in 1995, it was restored in line with its historical appearance. The hotel has 32 guest rooms.

In March 2006, the castle and its 67,000-square-foot estate was purchased at a forced sale by the present owner Dominik von Boettinger. Today Spyker Castle is a hotel and restaurant.

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Address

Schlossallee 10, Glowe, Germany
See all sites in Glowe

Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Bert Schmidtchen (5 months ago)
Very nice and quiet, contemplative and for people who like a special ambience. I can imagine spending a few days there.
Birger Tommos (10 months ago)
Nicely priced and good breakfast.
Klaus Kunze (12 months ago)
Eine angenehme und ruhige Atmosphäre lädt zum Erholen ein. Beste Lage für Ausflüge im Norden von Rügen. Sehr schöne Parklandschaft im Umfeld. Restaurant Wrangel mit abwechslungsreicher Karte.
Iris Lachmann (13 months ago)
Came just so spontaneously last night for something to eat and were totally amazed that we were not sent away as usual, but received warmly, even though the hotel / restaurant was well attended. The food was also very good from a very mixed menu, where everyone is sure to find something. In terms of price, no complaints either! Thank you very much - we'd love to come back.
Sandra Stępniak (15 months ago)
Beware of cheaters. We had a confirmed booking and they doubled the price without any apologies. Now we are left without an overnight stay, and all interesting offers have long been booked.
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