Spyker Castle

Glowe, Germany

The Spyker (Spycker) Castle and estate is the oldest profane structure on the Baltic Sea island of Rügen. Spycker was first recorded in 1318. It belonged then to the Stralsund patrician family von Külpens. In 1344 a daughter from the House of von Külpen married the Jasmunds. As a result the Spyker branch of the von Jasmunds was founded which died without issue in 1648.

As a result of the Thirty Years' War, Pomerania, and hence Rügen, fell to Sweden under the Treaty of Westphalia in 1648. As a reward for his wartime services, Queen Christine of Sweden gave the now empty seat of Spycker in 1649 to the Swedish field marshal and later governor-general of Swedish Pomerania, Carl Gustav Wrangel. The castle, originally furnished with a defensive moat, was remodelled after 1650 into its present appearance as a Renaissance schloss and painted in Swedish Falu red, which was atypical of Rügen. Fully sculptured stucco ceilings, unique in the Baltic region, date to around 1652.

After the death of Carl Gustav Wrangel in 1676, the property passed to his daughter Eleanora-Sophia, wife of the Lord of Putbus. Eleanora-Sophia died in 1687, and the property went to the Swedish family of Brahe, with whom her older sister was connected by marriage. After its occupation by the Napoleonic troops in 1806/07 Spycker temporarily became the seat of the French governor of Rügen. In 1815, Rügen, which had hitherto been Swedish, was handed over to Prussia. Magnus Fredrik Brahe sold Spycker in 1817 and it came into the possession of Prince Wilhelm Malte I of Putbus.

Until the land reform in the Soviet Occupation Zone in 1945, the estate remained in the possession of the von Putbus family. In subsequent years, the castle was left to decay. From the 1960s until 1989, the East German trade union federation, FDGB, used the castle as a holiday home. Since 1990, the castle has been used as a hotel and, in 1995, it was restored in line with its historical appearance. The hotel has 32 guest rooms.

In March 2006, the castle and its 67,000-square-foot estate was purchased at a forced sale by the present owner Dominik von Boettinger. Today Spyker Castle is a hotel and restaurant.

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Address

Schlossallee 10, Glowe, Germany
See all sites in Glowe

Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ronny Kruegel (21 months ago)
sehr schön gelegen
Chantal Albers (2 years ago)
Sehr schöne Umgebung und sehr gute Gastfreundschaft. Restaurant und Frühstück ist fabelhaft und das Personal sehr freundlich. Auf jeden weiter zu empfehlen.
Daniel pester (2 years ago)
Der heutige Weihnachtsmarkt im Schloss Spyker war unterirdisch und entsprach keinesfalls der Qualität des Schlosses. Die Aussteller waren sehr nett und zuvorkommend.
Mattias Jonsson (4 years ago)
Relaxed place with ok kitchen and friendly personell
Florian Ebeling (7 years ago)
This is an enchanted place. On the plain, flat island, near an extended lake area lies this really old castle, a massive red house. You can feel how the dramas of the Thirty-years War have unfolded around here, which once belonged to a Swedish general. The restaurant serves very good food, even for someone looking only for vegetarian dishes like me. The non-veggie options are much more varied, though. It is a short menu, and it looks like each dish is on there only for that week, and then changes. It is definitely a surprise in quality, given that it is not being marketed as a high-end eating place. Walking in the area of the lake and in the confusing and beautiful garden is truly romantic. I thought it was some kind of archetypical (northern) german castle, and I had a really good time there.
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