St. Mary's Church

Greifswald, Germany

Marienkirche (St. Mary's Church) is unmissable because of a stubby tower called as 'Fat Mary'. The exact year of the construction is unkown. It is assumed that the building was begun after 1260. In 1275, the building plans were changed and the building continued as a three-nave hall church without a choir. In 1280 the building was mainly completed, but it can be assumed that the construction was still continued until the first half of the 14th century.

A Renaissance pulpit is a rare piece in an otherwise bare church.

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Details

Founded: c. 1260
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Monika S (2 years ago)
Blockhafte gotische Hallenkirche " dicke Marie" und mit dem Staffelgiebel im Osten, Teil der eindrucksvollen, markanten Silhouette der Stadt . Innen freigelegte Wandmalerei.
Jörg Bremer (3 years ago)
Die älteste der drei Stadtkirchen von Greifswald. Die "dicke Marie" wurde im 13. Jahrhundert errichtet.
Ronny Ueschner (3 years ago)
Sehr gut restaurierte Kirche. Beim Orgelspiel wunderschöne Akustik.
Levin Griebenow (3 years ago)
Es ist sine sehr schöne Kirche in Greifswald. Das Orgelkonzert am Sonntag war wirklich beeindruckend.
TheBestNoob 2018 (3 years ago)
Die St. Marien Kirche ist eine sehr schöne Kirche aus dem dreizehnten Jahrhundert. Mit diesem beträchtlichen Alter ist diese schöne Kirche die älteste der drei großen Kirchen in der Greifswalder Innenstadt. Leider muss die Kirche immer wieder restauriert werden, weshalb es sehr schön wäre wenn sie etwas für die Restaurierungsarbeiten spenden würden. Ich finde, dass die St. Marien Kirche eine der schönsten Kirche aus dem Landkreis Vorpommer-Greifswald ist und deshalb auf jedenfall einen Besuch wert ist.
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