Sümeg Castle was built in the latter half of the 13th century by Béla IV of Hungary. It is situated atop a mountain called 'Castle Hill'. Later, it was presented as a gift to the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Veszprém by Stephen V of Hungary. In the 15th century, the castle was fortified, and the second of two towers was built.In 1552, in response to the capture of Veszprém by the Turks, the castles was rebuilt and fortified to serve as a frontier fortress. In 1713, after the Austrian occupation during Rákóczi's War for Independence, troops set the castle on fire.

Today, the castle is the main tourist attraction for visitors to Sümeg. Since 1989, it has been privately held. It was restored on a large scale, and is now operated as a tourist attraction, providing events and tournaments. It is considered to be Hungary's most well-preserved fortress.

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Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Hungary

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Paul Hartford (14 months ago)
This castle is great. Not fully restored or overdone, but we'll presented with lots to see and some activities for kids.
Vince Gellár (15 months ago)
Many games, nice exhibition. Best in nice weather.
Monier Hervé (2 years ago)
Really nice place and interactive! I recommend visiting if you are passing by!
Máté Deák (2 years ago)
Very nice and very modernly renovated Hungarian castle on the top of the hill. It has got a spectacular view from the top.
BlackR65 (2 years ago)
Great castle with a lot of attractions. Delicious food in the bakery and great view on the surrounding area. The only minus are sometimes the missing translations in English or German to understand the historic backround as it is common in the Hungarian museums :/
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