Sümeg Castle

Sümeg, Hungary

Sümeg Castle was built in the latter half of the 13th century by Béla IV of Hungary. It is situated atop a mountain called 'Castle Hill'. Later, it was presented as a gift to the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Veszprém by Stephen V of Hungary. In the 15th century, the castle was fortified, and the second of two towers was built.In 1552, in response to the capture of Veszprém by the Turks, the castles was rebuilt and fortified to serve as a frontier fortress. In 1713, after the Austrian occupation during Rákóczi's War for Independence, troops set the castle on fire.

Today, the castle is the main tourist attraction for visitors to Sümeg. Since 1989, it has been privately held. It was restored on a large scale, and is now operated as a tourist attraction, providing events and tournaments. It is considered to be Hungary's most well-preserved fortress.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Hungary

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Henry Horn (4 years ago)
Old and under restoration most still original.
Daniel Michalko (4 years ago)
Historical castle with an amazing view and with some fun for kids
Ilona Janser (4 years ago)
Incredibly cheap and very beautiful. Lot of things do do inside. Perfect for families with kids. Also has a bar and free toilet.
J Degreef (4 years ago)
Price OK. Nice castle. Steep way up before the entrance. Stuff to do for the kids.
Michal Stanek (4 years ago)
Nice views and plenty of activities for younglings to take part in. Otherwise there is not much to see what can't be seen elsewhere (dungeon, some weapons, one furbished room). But the view is indeed nice and below the castle there is a nice restaurant/hotel offering other activities as well.
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