Festetics Palace

Keszthely, Hungary

The Festetics Family is one of the most significant ducal families in Hungary. The family, who was of Croatian origin, moved to Hungary in the 17th century. In 1739 Christopher Festetics (1696-1768) bought the Keszthely estate and its appurtenances, and chose it to be the centre of his estates. He began the construction of the Festetics Palacein 1745. The two-storey, U-shaped, 34-room Baroque palace was rebuilt several times in the 18th and 19th centuries. Between 1769 and 1770 Paul Festetics III, Christopher’s son had the building reconstructed. The wings were enlarged while the facades remained unaltered. His son, George Festetics I, started the next major reconstruction in 1792. He added the southern library wing to the palace.

Between 1883 and 1887 Tassilo Festetics II had the northern wing demolished and a new wing built which was joined to the old one by a turreted central part. Thus, he almost doubled the size of the palace. The building was covered with a mansard roof, and fitted with central heating and plumbing. After the modification of the facades and the interiors, especially the staircases, the palace acquired its present form.

The building is surrounded by a nature reserve park. The sights in the park include trees that are hundreds of years old, colourful flowerbeds, fountains, statues – among them the full-figure bronze statue of George Festetics I –, the garden pond and the fountain decorated with lions. The palm house and the former coach house with the coach exhibition can be found in the park, while the new building of the hunting exhibition and the historical model railway exhibition is opposite the back gate of the park.

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Details

Founded: 1745
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Hungary

More Information

helikonkastely.hu

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Evalynn B. (4 years ago)
This palace has so many ticket price to choose which part we want to see, what was a bit confusing. Different type of ticket we should buy if we want to take photos. We chose the inner palace and the landau-house, and even those places took about 3 hours to go around, so if someone wants to see the whole place, that is definitely a day-long trip. But it worth. Rich palace and famous in the country with huge beautiful garden, which unfortunately was re-build and renewish in the time when we visited, so even to cross it to the other houses was uncomfortable. However it is a must to see place if someone is around Lake Balaton.
Jeroen Spee (5 years ago)
There are multiple interesting things to visit that are easy to combine around this castle. The museum inside the castle itself is quite interesting. Then there's the wagon museum, which has an old Ford T as well. The hunting meseum and model train is were fun, but not that special.
Erazem Dolžan (5 years ago)
The inside of the castle was certainly interesting, we especially loved the wonderful library. I was slightly disappointed about the lack of English text, as most of the more modern information panels were only in Hungarian. Still, there is a small panel in Hungarian, English and German in every room, so you do get the basic info.
Raymond Loyal (5 years ago)
Nice place to go. Place reminds the visitor of Versailles and right so. Place and garden are a perfect ensemble. Entry is free, when visiting the exhibitions they charge you for. Young couples go there for their wedding shooting. Visitor groups are trooping through gardens and place. Recommendation to go there.
Dru Si (5 years ago)
Great park for walks and to cool down if the city gets to hot. It is great that you can only buy a ticket for one of the museum options or all if you want. The railway exhibition is great!
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