Wieliczka Salt Mine

Wieliczka, Poland

The Wieliczka Salt Mine was built in the 13th century and produced table salt continuously until 2007, as one of the world's oldest salt mines still in operation. From its beginning and throughout its existence, the Royal mine was run by the Żupy krakowskie Salt Mines.

The mine's attractions include dozens of statues and four chapels that have been carved out of the rock salt by the miners. The oldest sculptures are augmented by the new carvings by contemporary artists. About 1.2 million people visit the Wieliczka Salt Mine annually.

The Wieliczka salt mine reaches a depth of 327 metres and is over 287 kilometres long. In 1978 it was placed on the original UNESCO list of the World Heritage Sites. Even the crystals of the chandeliers are made from rock salt that has been dissolved and reconstituted to achieve a clear, glass-like appearance. It also houses a private rehabilitation and wellness complex.

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Founded: 13th century
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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Pete Greg (14 months ago)
This place is AWESOME!! No more words should be needed! If your in Krakow you have to need to visit the mines! Make sure you have a guided tour. Both informative and funny. The place will blow your mind. Lots of walking. Starting with over 600 steps down bit worth the effort. And don't worry there is a lift back up after the tour. The souvenirs are not expensive.
Holly (14 months ago)
Excellent experience! Fantastic tour from Agnieszka. Would high recommend to anyone visiting Krakow. Be aware that the lift to come out is INCREDIBLY small and we were really crammed in.
Τασος Κοκολακης (14 months ago)
Perfect place to visit. Cheap enough for what it is offering. Its better that you go on your own not with a tourist office because its half the price. Also the tour guide of the salt mine was very funny and gave us all the information and stories we need to know.
Sophie Gear (15 months ago)
Magical. Just incredible. Find the time to come here when in Warsaw and you'll not regret it. Wear comfortable shoes and be prepared to walk. The tunnels are considerably warmer than you'd think so don't worry about wrapping up too much.
Sam Daniel (15 months ago)
Very good. Really enjoyed. Great tour guide called "Paulina" (spelling maybe incorrect). Very informative and a lot of interesting facts. She really encouraged people to lick the walls and I highly recommend that you do!
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