Żupny Castle is a Gothic castle, the former headquarters of the Wieliczka and Bochnia Salt Mine. The castle is located in the former mine complex and was designated as part of the Wieliczka and Bochnia UNESCO World Heritage Site, since an expansion in 2013.

A castle was built on top of the hillside in the 13th century, under the reign of Casimir III the Great and Sigismund I the Old. The current castle was built in a square formation, including living quarters outside the castle walls. From the castle"s earliest days, up until 1945, the castle was the headquarters of the Wieliczka Salt Mine. Currently, the castle houses an exhibition containing the history of Wieliczka from the past decades, and the only collection of saltshakers in Poland.

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Address

Zamkowa 6, Wieliczka, Poland
See all sites in Wieliczka

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Poland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

June Paterson (3 months ago)
Beautiful works of art
Laura Areniece (4 months ago)
A great place to see when visiting Krakow! Highly recommend.
Cindy Kaliszka (4 months ago)
Worth the visit. Fantastic place
Martina Thaiszová (16 months ago)
Very impressive
Dan Humungous (2 years ago)
Pretty good if you like salt! Free entry on a saturday.
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