St. Mary's Basilica

Kraków, Poland

Church of Our Lady Assumed into Heaven (also known as St. Mary's Church) is a Brick Gothic church famous for its wooden altarpiece carved by Veit Stoss. According to chronicler Jan Długosz the first parish church at the Main Square in Kraków was founded in 1221–22 by the Bishop of Kraków, Iwo Odrowąż. The building was destroyed during the Mongol invasion of Poland. Between 1290–1300 the new early Gothic church was built on the remaining foundations. It was consecrated twenty years later, in 1320.

The church was completely rebuilt under the reign of Casimir III the Great between 1355 and 1365 with substantial contributions from wealthy restaurateur Mikołaj Wierzynek. The presbytery was elongated and tall windows added. The main body of the church was completed in 1395–97 with the new vault constructed by master Nicholas Werhner from Prague. However, the vault over the presbytery collapsed in 1442 due to a possible earthquake, which never happen before nor after in Kraków.

In the first half of the 15th century, the side chapels were added. Most of them were the work of master Franciszek Wiechoń. At the same time the northern tower was raised and designed to serve as the watch tower for the entire city. In 1478 carpenter Maciej Heringh funded a helmet for the tower. A gilded crown was placed on it in 1666, which is still present today. At the end of the 15th century, St Mary's church was enriched with a sculptural masterpiece, an Altarpiece of Veit Stoss (Ołtarz Mariacki Wita Stwosza) of late Gothic design.

In the 18th century, by the decision of vicar Jacek Augustyn Łopacki, the interior was rebuilt in the late Baroque style. The author of this work was Francesco Placidi. All 26 altars, equipment, furniture, benches and paintings were replaced and the walls were decorated with polychrome, the work of Andrzej Radwański.

At the beginning of the 19th century, the city has decided that a cemetery near the Basilica was to be shut down and made into a public square. Today it is known as Plac Mariacki (The Marian Square).[3] In the years 1887–1891, under the direction of Tadeusz Stryjeński the neo-Gothic design was introduced into the Basilica. The temple gained a new design and murals painted and funded by Jan Matejko, who worked with Stanislaw Wyspianski and Józef Mehoffer - the authors of stained glass in the presbytery.

On every hour, a trumpet signal—called the Hejnał mariacki—is played from the top of the taller of St. Mary's two towers. The plaintive tune breaks off in mid-stream, to commemorate the famous 13th century trumpeter, who was shot in the throat while sounding the alarm before the Mongol attack on the city. The noon-time hejnał is heard across Poland and abroad broadcast live by the Polish national Radio 1 Station.

St. Mary's Basilica also served as an architectural model for many of the churches that were built by the Polish diaspora abroad, particularly those like St. Michael's and St. John Cantius in Chicago, designed in the so-called Polish Cathedral style.

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Details

Founded: 1290-1320
Category: Religious sites in Poland

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

DataHermit (21 months ago)
From outside we were not expecting this amount of wonder inside. Very very beautiful. Well preserved and maintained.
Juraj Laclavik (21 months ago)
This Basilica is spectacular, marvelous and beautiful piece of art. Definitelly worth to visit mass celebration, hear great choir and check all the paintings inside. Next time I will hopefully visit also the tower and see the area arround main square from the top.
Aaron Harrop (21 months ago)
Incredible church to visit,looks on the outside are verry deceiving as it appears small but is anything but when you go inside,all the pillars and walls are covered in incredible details and as many churches in Poland is still used on a daily basis so up most respect and privacy is paramount! We had an excellent tour guide who was able to explain Sweden's two year occupancy and how all the gold trim was stolen by the Swedish and is now gold plated,well worth the visit.
Ruslan Gilka (22 months ago)
Saint Mary's Church. Krakow, Poland. Every hour the trumpeter plays the melody from the highest tower of the church. The legend says that when Mongols were here, one of their arrows hit the neck of the trumpeter, so he didn't finish his melody. In honor of him nowadays trumpeters still play this reduced melody.
Nina Mustafić (22 months ago)
Absolutely breath-taking! The inside of the basilica is embellished with wooden motives, as those made of marble and metal. The icons are adorned with luxurious golden frames.The altar is rich with statues depicting biblical events and figures. And on top of all that, the tickets are really cheap!
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