Church of St. Adalbert

Kraków, Poland

The Church of St. Adalbert is one of the oldest stone churches in Poland. The Church was built in the 11th century and named after the martyred missionary Saint Adalbert whose body was bought back for its weight in gold from the pagan Prussia and placed in Gniezno Cathedral by Boleslaus I of Poland. The interior of the church is cramped, relative to its larger exterior. The floor level is situated under the present level of the Square, which reflects the overlaying of the subsequent surfaces of the plaza with pavement originally adjusted to the two already existing churches (St. Wojciech/Adalbert and St. Mary's Basilica). The church was partially reconstructed in the Baroque style between 1611-1618.

According to the Archeological Museum of Kraków, the oldest relics reveal a wooden structure built at the end of the 10th century and followed by an original stone church constructed in the 11th century, as seen in the lower parts of the walls. These walls became a foundation for a new church built around the turn of the 11th and 12th centuries from smaller rectangular stones. Since the level of the plaza, overlaid with new pavement, rose between 2 to 2.6 meters, the walls of the church were raised up in the 17th century and then covered with stucco. The new entrance was built from the west side and the church was topped with the new Baroque dome. The restoration of the church conducted in the 19th century led to the discovery of its Romanesque past.

At present, the walls of the church are unearthed to show their lowest level. On the south side there's a Romanesque portal and corresponding stone step. The crypt of the church has been adapted by the Archeological Museum as a small Museum of the History of the Market Square showing a permanent exhibit of 'The History of the Kraków Market.'

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Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Religious sites in Poland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Niko Gritchiano (17 months ago)
It places on the corner of the marketplace exactly on the road to Wavel's castle
Cracow For You - Local Tours & More (18 months ago)
The church of St. Wojciech ⛪ Its almost 1000-year-old history
Lorelay (2 years ago)
Magic place full of harmony. Being so small , with a warm atmosphere , and rich of sculptures and paintings as well it is a church that everyone can call it theirs. Thanks to the thickness of the walls, outside noise remains outside.
Marc Albert (2 years ago)
A very small and ancient church. It's definitely worth sticking your head in to take a look. The crypt beneath the church is a National Museum and is free on Tuesdays. There's really not much to see and it's hardly worth your time.
Osvis (2 years ago)
Pretty basic village style church, but I really recommend to visit basement of the "real" church.
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