Czchów Castle Ruins

Czchów, Poland

The history of the Czchów Castle dates back to the 13th century, when a Romanesque watchtower was built here. In the 14th century, a defensive castle was added to the tower. It became the residence of the Czchów starostas, and was destroyed in the Swedish wars of the mid-17th century. Finally, the castle lost its military importance, and was turned into a prison, which was closed in 1772, after the first partition of Poland. Currently, the only remaining parts of the complex are a 14th-century tower and foundations of the defensive wall.

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Address

Sądecka 28, Czchów, Poland
See all sites in Czchów

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Ruins in Poland

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Klaudiusz Dzik (20 months ago)
Bardzo fajny pomysł na rewitalizację.
Zołza Maruda (21 months ago)
Bywam czasami w Czchowie i... Hm...zobaczyć można raz lub dwa, być może będą jakieś konkretne atrakcje po skończonym remoncie. Szkoda wielka, że w samym Rynku, czyli sercu „miasta” nie ma ani jednego miejsca, gdzie można zjeść obiad. Trzeba zabrać ze sobą bułki...
Krzysztof Langiewicz (2 years ago)
Miejsce urocze przed wejściem na ścieżkę prowadzącą do wieży ładnie zagospodarowane. Na górze remont, jakieś fundamenty były to może za jakiś czas ukaże się na wzgórzu cały zamek.
Wieslaw Zabawa (2 years ago)
To kolejny obiekt w dzisiejszej Małopolsce, który kona. Może prace, które są tu prowadzone to zmienią. Oby tak się stało, bo z wielką przykrością ogląda się miejsca z wielowiekową historią skazane z różnych względów na ruinę i zapomnienie.
Joanna Latocha (2 years ago)
Picturesque Romanesque castle ruins. What's left of the original 14th century castle is a part of a tower. Apparently there are some renovation plans, although it's difficult to say when the renovation will be completed. During my visit few years back it was impossible to climb to the top of the tower (maybe it has changed...?). The place is rather quiet, not many tourists around. Not much to see just yet, but definitely worth a short visit.
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