Ojców Castle Ruins

Ojców, Poland

Ojców Castle was part of a system of castles known as the Eagle's Nests - formerly protecting the southern border of the Kingdom of Poland. Currently it houses a museum dedicated to the castle in its renovated castle-tower. The castle was used as a stronghold, built by Casimir III the Great in the second half of the 14th century.

A legend mentions, that the caste was built by the Duke of Wrocław Wiesław I, Popiel's brother-in-law, however te first recorded information about the castle comes from the fourteenth century - linking up with King Casimir III the Great, who used the castle as part of his defensive line against the Kingdom of Bohemia and the south. The King was called the castle in honour of his father, Władysław I Łokietek, calling it Father by the Rock. In 1665 the stronghold was taken over by the Swedes, which they partially burned and deconstructed. The House of Koryciński, who owned the castle, had renovated it, and built additional living quarters. Various battles throughout the oncoming centuries had caused the castle to be shifted between different owners. Causing the castle to go through several cycles of renovation and deconstruction, currently the castle stands as the picturesque, and renovated ruin.

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Ojców, Poland
See all sites in Ojców

Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Ruins in Poland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org
www.ojcow.pl

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Artem Zaleskovskiy (2 years ago)
Such a beautiful place.
Maxim K. (2 years ago)
Good viewpoint place. Recommended
Susan D (2 years ago)
Wow, wow, wow! So beautiful and peaceful.
Tigran Tumyan (2 years ago)
Great spot for outing and rest close to Krakow
polishamericanjunky 102 (2 years ago)
Nice little castle to see, also plenty of walking in the area for anybody who likes exercise.
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