Rõngu Castle Ruins

Tartumaa, Estonia

The exact construction period of Rõngu vassal fortress is not known, but it was probably completed around 1340. The Holy Cross Chapel, located here, was mentioned in the year 1413. During the Middle Ages, the stronghold belonged to the Tödwen family. The fortress was destroyed by the troops of the Order in 1558 and burnt by Jesuits in 1625.

The majority of the castle's layout is not visible over the ground surface. An approximately 25-metre-long section from the outer wall of the eastern side has been preserved, there is also the opening of the main gate. The ruins have not been conserved and fall down gradually. The castle hill is surrounded by a 12-hectare park, which has beautiful majestic oaks, larches and other ancient trees.

Reference: Võrtsjärv Travel Guide

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Details

Founded: ca. 1340
Category: Miscellaneous historic sites in Estonia
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

More Information

www.vortsjarv.ee
www.rongu.ee

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mariina Kallas (2 years ago)
It was a very interesting place
Mauris Laane (3 years ago)
could be bigger
Leonid Romanov (3 years ago)
Suure-Rõngu Manor from the early 15th century. The vassal castle was destroyed during the Livonian War. The main building of 1780 burned down in 1917, leaving fragments of the foundation.
Elin Hainsalu (3 years ago)
I live near the ruins of this fortress. Unfortunately, the castle is quite dilapidated, but it is still beautiful. The park is also beautiful.
Anton Beliy (4 years ago)
Here, a mansion is drawn, but in fact it is not
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