Rõngu Castle Ruins

Tartumaa, Estonia

The exact construction period of Rõngu vassal fortress is not known, but it was probably completed around 1340. The Holy Cross Chapel, located here, was mentioned in the year 1413. During the Middle Ages, the stronghold belonged to the Tödwen family. The fortress was destroyed by the troops of the Order in 1558 and burnt by Jesuits in 1625.

The majority of the castle's layout is not visible over the ground surface. An approximately 25-metre-long section from the outer wall of the eastern side has been preserved, there is also the opening of the main gate. The ruins have not been conserved and fall down gradually. The castle hill is surrounded by a 12-hectare park, which has beautiful majestic oaks, larches and other ancient trees.

Reference: Võrtsjärv Travel Guide

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Details

Founded: ca. 1340
Category: Ruins in Estonia
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

More Information

www.rongu.ee
www.vortsjarv.ee

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

kristi tiits (18 months ago)
Ilus koht kus jalutada.
Elin Hainsalu (18 months ago)
Elan selle linnuse varemete juures. Kahjuks on linnus üsna lagunenud, aga ilus on sellegipoolest. Park on samuti kaunis.
Kairi-Kristiine Haller (2 years ago)
Väga vähe on säilinud vanast linnusest
Kristiina Järve (2 years ago)
Põlispuudega park ja jupike vasallilinnust
Ege Kõrge (2 years ago)
Autoga parkimine olemas, piknikukoht ka.
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