Güstrow Cathedral

Güstrow, Germany

Güstrow Cathedral is a Brick Gothic Lutheran cathedral initially completed in 1335. It is the oldest extant building in Barlachstadt Güstrow. The church was originally dedicated by the Bishop of Kammin. The cathedral's charter was removed in 1552, and the cathedral fell into disuse and was used to house vehicles for 12 years. In 1568 it began to be used as an evangelical palace chapel and resting place for Güstrow's aristocratic house, maintaining this honour until 1695.

The Güstrow Cathedral attests to the influence of several different styles: began as a Romenesque building it was completed as a Brick Gothic site. The cathedral is home to a multitude of artistic treasures spanning a historical period lasting from the Late Romantic epoch through to the Early Modern period. Amongst the most well-known are a Late Gothic winged altar made by Hinrik Bornemann, a monument to Duke Ulrich designed by Phillip Brandin and an apostle figure conceptualised by Ernst Barlach, known as 'the Waverer'. The latter was dedicated to the war in 1927; was denounced as 'degenerate art' in 1937 and was melted military for use during the Second World War. In 1953, the 'Waverer' was remolded, and was replaced in the cathedral, hanging above a 18th century cast-iron baptism font.

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Address

Domplatz 2, Güstrow, Germany
See all sites in Güstrow

Details

Founded: 1335
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Rene Janke (8 months ago)
Tolles Gebäude außen wie innen unbedingt sehenswert, wenn man in Güstrow ist.
Laura wieso (10 months ago)
Eine wunderschöne Kirche und Andacht (vor allem schön gewärmt für diese Wintertage). Der "schwebende Engel" von Ernst Barlach ist kaum zu übersehen
Thomas Bartz (11 months ago)
Mega.. Muss man gesehen haben
Annelie Fritsche (12 months ago)
Als Güstrowerin finde ich unseren Dom sowieso schön,aber was die Kirchgemeinde mit "Güstrow schwebt" auf die Beine gestellt hat ist einfach unbeschreiblich! Ich war mit meiner Familie am 3.10.18 zu Kunst und Genuß und bin auch jetzt noch restlos gefangen von der Atmosphäre. Tolle Eindrücke,super Musik uns Klasse Menü. Danke!
Matthias Schollmeyer (2 years ago)
'Must-see' in Güstrow
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