Holstentor (Holsten Gate) is the most well-know symbol of Lübeck. The city gate was built between 1464 and 1478 along the lines of Dutch models. Its purpose served both as a form of defence and as a form of prestige. Above the round-arched gateway entrance of the twin-towered construction, the inscription CONCORDIA DOMI FORIS PAX (unity at home, peace abroad) can clearly be seen in golden letters.

Nearly every visitor is astonished by its odd leaning angle and its sunken south tower. But, during the 15th century people weren"t quite as knowledgeable on 'foundation work' as they are today. As only the towers are standing on a 'gridiron' with the heavy middle tract resting upon them, the towers unevenly subsided into the marshy ground.

In 1863, the Gate looked an appalling sight. With a majority of just one single vote, the city parliament decided to restore the gate and began extensive restoration efforts. It wasn"t until 70 years later that the subsidence could be stopped. Most recent renovations were carried out between 2004 and 2006. Here, the slate roof, terracotta frieze and parts of the brickwork were replaced. Inside the gate historic ship models, suits of armour, weapons, legal instruments and merchandise give a brief glimpse into the time of the Hanseatic League. Two majestic lions stand guarding the city in front of the Holsten Gate.

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Details

Founded: 1464-1478
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Campbell Boyd (9 months ago)
Fascinating history of Lubeck. Amply illustrated with physical as opposed to documentary exhibits.
Ket Tee (10 months ago)
Really neat place to visit if you're in the area. Very lively and bustling with culture. The Holstentor is great to visit and have a semi-romantic picnic nearby...
Francesco Xodo (10 months ago)
Beautiful building that served as a town gate in a complex of four. Built between 1464 and 1478 by architect Hinrich Helmstede, it has been reconstructed twice in 1863 and 1933. It houses a museum that I haven't had the chance to visit.
syafa haack (11 months ago)
Unique architecture. Wheelchair is not accessible as you need to climb the stairs. Ticket for adult: €7. Kids: €2.50. Kids under 6 years old: free.
Kim Hudson (13 months ago)
Really interesting. Really really interesting! Good to have comprehensive information in English too. Tells the story of the historic building and of the city of Lubeck. Quite a lot to interest children as well as adults. Inevitably lots and lots of stairs.
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