Lübeck Town Hall is one of the most beautiful town halls in Germany. From 1230, three gabled houses were constructed on the marketplace and extended over the next few centuries to ultimately create the Hansesaal (Hanseatic Hall) for meetings; and the Danzelhus (Dance Hall) for social meetings.

Its interior boasts a grand audience hall: Don't be surprised to see the doors to this former courtroom have different heights. Acquitted defendants were allowed to leave the hall via the tall door, sentenced defendants had to remove their hats and leave via the low door.

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Details

Founded: 1230
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Arne Theuerkauf (2 years ago)
We didn't go inside, but even from the outside a must see.
Kai Bohnhoff (2 years ago)
Ok
Oh yeah yeah • 7 years in the future (3 years ago)
Guided tour Frau was eccentric to say the least... Kept shouting "MIENE DAMEN UND HERREN" Quite annoying but oh well the interior was rather nice. It would of been nice to walk around by ourselves but then we wouldn't have the joy of MIENE DAMEN UND HERREN!"
lupus london (3 years ago)
Fuehrung great! :-))
Kamil Symela (4 years ago)
I strongly recommend the guided tour.
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