Lübeck Town Hall is one of the most beautiful town halls in Germany. From 1230, three gabled houses were constructed on the marketplace and extended over the next few centuries to ultimately create the Hansesaal (Hanseatic Hall) for meetings; and the Danzelhus (Dance Hall) for social meetings.

Its interior boasts a grand audience hall: Don't be surprised to see the doors to this former courtroom have different heights. Acquitted defendants were allowed to leave the hall via the tall door, sentenced defendants had to remove their hats and leave via the low door.

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Details

Founded: 1230
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

www.luebeck-tourism.de

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Pedro Falcon (2 years ago)
PROS: great for pedestrians | perfect old town | peaceful and relaxing CONS: more benches would be great
JS (2 years ago)
Beautiful Rathaus!
Vinay Kulkarni (2 years ago)
Amazing place. Town hall. City center. Scenic. Photo point. Vintage.
Alessandro De Oliveira Bastos (4 years ago)
Beautiful Gothic architecture
Arne Theuerkauf (5 years ago)
We didn't go inside, but even from the outside a must see.
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