St. Peter's Church

Lübeck, Germany

St. Peter's Church, once three-naved, was built between 1227 and 1250 and expanded in the 15th and 16th century to a five-naved Gothic hall church. The church roof was destroyed during the Second World War and was provided with an emergency roof in 1960. Reconstruction was only completed in 1987.

Nowadays, St. Peter's is no longer used as a church. Instead, the 800-year-old light and airy church interior has evolved into a vibrant centre for events and exhibitions. A large arts and crafts market takes place here during the Christmas period.

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Details

Founded: 1227-1250
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

www.luebeck-tourism.de

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Petr Chudoba (22 months ago)
photo from the top of the churche:
Pranit Anand (2 years ago)
Fine structure. Inviting views from viewing gallery. Cozy cafe attached.
Greg G (2 years ago)
What better way to see the city of Lubeck and it's surrounds. Amazing views.
Rachel Lim (2 years ago)
Great view from the top, although very windy. There is an elevator up, but there are still some stairs. Tower is open until 8 in the summer although the church closes earlier (6?)
Palle Holm Poulsen (2 years ago)
A fantastic view in clear weather. You can see all Lübeck from here. The 3 Euro in the hallway, well spent, because there is a lift to the top. This view has to be seen.
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