Minneburg Castle Ruins

Neckargerach, Germany

Minneburg was built some time in the 1200s, though its origin unknown. According to legend, the castle name was derived from a woman, Minna von Horneck by name, who was the love of Graf von Schwarzenberg who left on the Crusades. When he returned he found her on her deathbed and promised to build a castle in her honor.

The Bergfried, or main tower, as well as the palas were completed around 1300, situated on a prominent rock outcrop above the Neckar River. The shieldwall was built between 1518-1521 and was composed of two separate walls, of which the outer along the dry moat has mostly vanished. The first official mention of the castle appears to have been in 1339, with the early owner being Eberhardt Rudt von Collenberg, a scion of a Frankish noble family that owned and traded properties from the Rhein to the Neckar. As early as 1349, the castle was pawned to Ruprecht I Elector Palatinate, then later to Hofwart von Sickingen, and then later to the von Steinach family, only to once more settle into the possession of the Elector Palatinate in 1499.

By the early 1500s, the castle passed to Vogt Wilhelm von Harben, who extended the outer works of the castle and added some amenities such as running water. The family line died out around 1600, and the castle became a winery. Despite such a 'peaceful' purpose, the castle was still defended for the Protestant cause against the Catholic League troops of Count Tilly. Tilly besieged the castle in 1622, which soon surrendered after some significant damage when the walls were breached. Afterwards, the ruin was used as a quarry for the locals who pilfered the stones for their own building projects. Efforts to prevent futher deterioration of the ruin began in the late 1800s, but these were suspended for many years until the 1970s.

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Neckargerach, Germany
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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Ruins in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sven Schäfer (11 months ago)
The facility is only a short walk away. In the courtyard you can sit down nicely for a little snack. Unfortunately, parts of the facility are closed due to the acute risk of collapse.
Petra Schneider (11 months ago)
The castle is incredibly beautiful and you can well imagine how people lived back then. It's just a shame that some people can't take their rubbish home with them, unfortunately you see it again and again.
Hunde Unterwegs (13 months ago)
So where do I start I would like to give the castle 5 stars. For me one of the most beautiful castle ruins that I have visited so far! The ascent is normally feasible even for small children, in a very beautiful area on the Necker. When we arrived at the top, we were in a bad mood, we were standing in front of a cordoned off area of ​​the castle, with a sign that it was forbidden to enter the castle. We went to look anyway and it was worth it ? I can't understand the entire cordon (the fence at the entrance was only half put up), and I can't understand that you don't care about something beautiful that it will be preserved for the future.
Michaela Clarke (2 years ago)
Great picnic area, closed castle due to damage
Ross Grant (2 years ago)
Picturesque ruined castle. Unfortunately due to a general state of falling-downess you can't currently access the building itself, just the grounds.
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