Bruchsal Palace

Bruchsal, Germany

Bruchsal Palace (Schloss Bruchsal) is the only Prince-Bishop’s residence on the Upper Rhine. It is famous for its opulent Baroque staircase constructed by Balthasar Neumann. Bruchsal Palace was constructed in 1720 as a residence for the Prince-Bishops of Speyer. The then Prince-Bishop, Damian Hugo von Schönborn, an avid art collector, played an important role in planning the complex. The three-wing palace is built of sandstone. The collection of exquisitely matched buildings, along with the carefully laid out garden, make up an extraordinarily beautiful ensemble.

Visitors entering Bruchsal Palace’s cour d'honneur (three-sided grand courtyard) are greeted with a splendid and colourful sight. The buildings are lavishly painted, decorated with gold-plated stucco, and feature golden gargoyles in the shape of dragons. Construction of the famous staircase by Balthasar Neumann began in 1728. This stunning architectural masterpiece is unsurpassed in terms of its unique style and the poetry of its design. Franz Christoph von Hutten, who resided in the palace after Schönborn, made his mark by decorating the Fürstensaal (Prince’s hall), Marmorsaal (marble hall) and the exquisite Paradezimmer (grand rooms).

The palace complex was almost completely destroyed during the Second World War. Fortunately, the structure of the staircase was mostly preserved. The palace complex’s reconstruction was one of Baden-Württemberg’s most impressive projects of this kind. Today, Bruchsal Palace is more than a breathtaking example of Baroque architecture – it is also the outstanding result of carefully-planned, highly historically accurate reconstruction work.

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Claire Arndt (3 months ago)
The day was cloudy but that didn't detract from the beauty of this castle. Rooms full of chandeliers and tapestries. Audio guides available at an additional cost. Will be back again to see the garden in the warmer months, even without the greenery the gardens were still pleasant. Parked in the paid for parking area.
World Traveller (5 months ago)
Really beautiful experience! Would recommend to anyone interested in architecture. Also there's great exhibitions inside!
Hannes Ruf (8 months ago)
Pretty decent palace, I'd reside there in a heartbeat. But I honestly do not understand why the entire area hasn't been to a car-free neighborhood?
Youliana Sadowski (9 months ago)
Very nice palace, well restored and we enjoyed the musical instruments museum. The gardens were a little disappointing as they were very plain, but maybe they didn't have funds to fully restore them. However, the interior was beautiful and there weren't too many tourists, so it was pleasant walking around.
Josefina Gregoris (10 months ago)
Went there last year and the exhibitions were amazing. This time I paid a visit to the castle just from the outside. Still impressive
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Royal Palace of Naples was one of the four residences near Naples used by the Bourbon Kings during their rule of the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies (1734-1860): the others were the palaces of Caserta, Capodimonte overlooking Naples, and the third Portici, on the slopes of Vesuvius.

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