Bruchsal Palace

Bruchsal, Germany

Bruchsal Palace (Schloss Bruchsal) is the only Prince-Bishop’s residence on the Upper Rhine. It is famous for its opulent Baroque staircase constructed by Balthasar Neumann. Bruchsal Palace was constructed in 1720 as a residence for the Prince-Bishops of Speyer. The then Prince-Bishop, Damian Hugo von Schönborn, an avid art collector, played an important role in planning the complex. The three-wing palace is built of sandstone. The collection of exquisitely matched buildings, along with the carefully laid out garden, make up an extraordinarily beautiful ensemble.

Visitors entering Bruchsal Palace’s cour d'honneur (three-sided grand courtyard) are greeted with a splendid and colourful sight. The buildings are lavishly painted, decorated with gold-plated stucco, and feature golden gargoyles in the shape of dragons. Construction of the famous staircase by Balthasar Neumann began in 1728. This stunning architectural masterpiece is unsurpassed in terms of its unique style and the poetry of its design. Franz Christoph von Hutten, who resided in the palace after Schönborn, made his mark by decorating the Fürstensaal (Prince’s hall), Marmorsaal (marble hall) and the exquisite Paradezimmer (grand rooms).

The palace complex was almost completely destroyed during the Second World War. Fortunately, the structure of the staircase was mostly preserved. The palace complex’s reconstruction was one of Baden-Württemberg’s most impressive projects of this kind. Today, Bruchsal Palace is more than a breathtaking example of Baroque architecture – it is also the outstanding result of carefully-planned, highly historically accurate reconstruction work.

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User Reviews

annacassarparnis@gmail.com annamark (2 years ago)
Bruchsal Schloss wonderful Baroque style and lovely gardens and the collection musical boxes
Renata Niedzielska (2 years ago)
Beautiful, fantastic place, especially for everyone who loves music
Marco Valente (2 years ago)
Thoroughly enjoyed visiting the castle, a must visit if you are in Bruchsal.
Sven (2 years ago)
I wandered around the halls and then joined the music automaton tour. A (super pretty!) girl explained a few nice facts in German and demonstrated some machines. It was great fun, I would highly recommend.
Bhagwati (2 years ago)
Nice place. The highlight is the automatic music museum where there are many mechanically operated music instruments. The instruments are well maintained and the staff is very friendly. On request they play the instruments and also tell the history. Tour with guide is also available in afternoon slot. The top floor is open since an year now for public. Some of the original carpets of the castle which were taken out timely and stored in the basement of the castle when it was destroyed during world war can also be seen on the top floor. Photographs and video shoot is allowed. It is also wheel chair accessible. The Schloss garden is a nice walk with beautiful sculptures and fountain.
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