Bruchsal Palace

Bruchsal, Germany

Bruchsal Palace (Schloss Bruchsal) is the only Prince-Bishop’s residence on the Upper Rhine. It is famous for its opulent Baroque staircase constructed by Balthasar Neumann. Bruchsal Palace was constructed in 1720 as a residence for the Prince-Bishops of Speyer. The then Prince-Bishop, Damian Hugo von Schönborn, an avid art collector, played an important role in planning the complex. The three-wing palace is built of sandstone. The collection of exquisitely matched buildings, along with the carefully laid out garden, make up an extraordinarily beautiful ensemble.

Visitors entering Bruchsal Palace’s cour d'honneur (three-sided grand courtyard) are greeted with a splendid and colourful sight. The buildings are lavishly painted, decorated with gold-plated stucco, and feature golden gargoyles in the shape of dragons. Construction of the famous staircase by Balthasar Neumann began in 1728. This stunning architectural masterpiece is unsurpassed in terms of its unique style and the poetry of its design. Franz Christoph von Hutten, who resided in the palace after Schönborn, made his mark by decorating the Fürstensaal (Prince’s hall), Marmorsaal (marble hall) and the exquisite Paradezimmer (grand rooms).

The palace complex was almost completely destroyed during the Second World War. Fortunately, the structure of the staircase was mostly preserved. The palace complex’s reconstruction was one of Baden-Württemberg’s most impressive projects of this kind. Today, Bruchsal Palace is more than a breathtaking example of Baroque architecture – it is also the outstanding result of carefully-planned, highly historically accurate reconstruction work.

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Velana (2 months ago)
Delightful and impressive palace with wonderful garden. A true sightseeing pearl not far away from Karlsruhe. Easy to reach by S.
Sadia Noor (5 months ago)
Wonderful place and the gardens are so peaceful that one can relax in the middle of nature. Highly recommended
Claire Arndt (8 months ago)
The day was cloudy but that didn't detract from the beauty of this castle. Rooms full of chandeliers and tapestries. Audio guides available at an additional cost. Will be back again to see the garden in the warmer months, even without the greenery the gardens were still pleasant. Parked in the paid for parking area.
World Traveller (10 months ago)
Really beautiful experience! Would recommend to anyone interested in architecture. Also there's great exhibitions inside!
Anees Abbasi (11 months ago)
If you visit Bruchsal, the first thing you will find to visit is Castle of Beuchsal. It is located in the heat of city and very near to train station. It is very beautiful place with old historical building along with an open area around that. You can walk by foot to reach here from centre of the city. On some days there is a flee market also infornt of this castle.
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