Schloss Rastatt is a baroque palace built between 1700 and 1707 by the Italian architect Domenico Egidio Rossi. The palace and garden were built to Margrave Louis William of Baden. During the Palatine war of succession the residence of Margrave Louis William of Baden-Baden had been burnt by French troops. A rebuild of the destroyed castle would not have suited the representative needs of the court of Baden-Baden. Since he also needed a home for his wife Sibylle Auguste of Saxe-Lauenburg, whom he had married in 1690, he had a new residence built in place of the former hunting lodge.

During this operation the 1697 hunting lodge was demolished to leave space for the new castle. The village of Rastatt was promoted to city status in 1700 and the Margrave moved here with his court. The residence in Rastatt is the oldest Baroque residence in the German Upper-Rhine area. It was built according to the example of the French Palace of Versailles. During the 19th century the castle was used as headquarters.

Inside the palace a large staircase with stucco decorations give way to the Beletage. The biggest and most decorated hall is the Ahnensaal. It is decorated with numerous frescoes and shows paintings of ancestors and of captured Ottoman soldiers.

The castle was not damaged during World War II. Today the castle is home of two museums, the military history museum and memorial site for the German liberation movement.

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Details

Founded: 1700-1707
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Germany
Historical period: Thirty Years War & Rise of Prussia (Germany)

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Julia Alex (9 months ago)
Beautiful castle, was not expected to find this pearl in Rastatt..
Maria Shalepo (10 months ago)
Amazing little town, which provides so much to see. 100% worth visiting. We've been here before COVID era, in October. The weather were perfect, even then there were not too many people around. I've never heard of this travel destination before I had to get to Baden-Baden airport. And it's such a shame, that neither haven't many other people as well! Don't know the reason why it's less popular than Karlsruhe or Strasbourg. As a tourist in the region, you should mark it as a must-stop and surely visit it for a day (no need to stay any longer - it's really compact and one day is enough to see everything).
Sanjay Sridhar (12 months ago)
Nice glorious place
Vasi Simea (2 years ago)
A perfect place for a walk while in Rastatt, its garden and the outskirts are truely amazing. It's a pleasure walking there every time
Goldschmidt Nicolae (2 years ago)
Very nice!
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