Karlsruhe Palace

Karlsruhe, Germany

Karlsruhe Palace was erected in 1715 by Margrave Charles III William of Baden-Durlach, after a dispute with the citizens of his previous capital, Durlach. The city of Karlsruhe has since grown around it. The first building was constructed by Jakob Friedrich von Batzendorf. The city was planned with the tower of the palace at the centre and 32 streets radiating out from it like spokes on a wheel, or ribs on a folding fan.

Originally partially made of wood, the palace had to be rebuilt in 1746, using stone. Charles Frederick, Margrave of Baden-Durlach at the time, and who eventually became Charles Frederick, Grand Duke of Baden then had the palace altered by Balthasar Neumann and Friedrich von Kesslau until 1770, adding larger windows and doors, pavilions and wings. In 1785, Wilhelm Jeremias Müller shortened the tower, adding a cupola.

During the Revolutions of 1848, Leopold, Grand Duke of Baden was expelled in 1849 for some time. In 1918, the last monarch Frederick II, Grand Duke of Baden had to move out. The former residence of the Rulers of Baden is since used as Badisches Landesmuseum.

Much of the city centre, including the palace, was reduced to rubble by Allied bombing during World War II but was quickly rebuilt after the war.

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User Reviews

Mr Huesca (2 years ago)
Nice and green city full of bikes. Massive and beautiful park with the castle as main attraction.
Milan Juhas (2 years ago)
Didn't get inside due to Covid situation, but the Palace is beautiful both - in night and day. The road towards castle is magical and in dark sought by couples. Why? Romantic and well preserved; walking around makes you feel like some nobility. During day the park around is visited by families and groups alike.
Alexey Maleev (2 years ago)
Karl's castle in the quiet place, "Karls ruhe" means "Karl's quietness". Modern square with underground parking. The castle is buried in greenery. October beer fest, summer projection show, Christmas market - the traditional life. 
Dalvinder Singh (2 years ago)
This is very good place to spend time with family and friends. U can see lots off greenery ...
Elvia Mata (2 years ago)
I was expecting to see anything about the palace; though there are 4 rooms open, a really interesting exhibition but nothing about the palace history
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