Sainte-Madeleine Church

Strasbourg, France

The Sainte-Madeleine Church was built in Gothic style in the late 15th century, but largely rebuilt in a style close to Jugendstil after a devastating fire in 1904. Destroyed again during World War II, the church was re-constructed in its modern form. This is the fourth building dedicated to Mary Magdalene built in the city since the 13th century. The church is classified as a historic monument by a decree of 6 December 1898.

The first convent dedicated to Mary Magdalene was built in 1225 on the outskirts of the city of Strasbourg, on the site of the current place de la République. The institution, which welcomed repentant prostitutes, was evacuated and then destroyed around 1470, since the city feared imminent invasion by the armies of the Duke of Burgundy.

A new convent was rebuilt in the Krutenau district. The Gothic church of the convent of the sisters of the order of St. Mary Magdalene, completed in 1478, was destroyed by fire in 1904. All that remains of this church, the last Gothic structure built in Strasbourg, is the choir housing fragments of some frescoes. It now serves as a chapel, dedicated to the Blessed Sacrament. Remains of the once abundant stained glass windows that decorated the church are shown in the Musée de l’Œuvre Notre-Dame. John Calvin had made sermons and directed services in that church.

The current church, which is perpendicular to the earlier building, was built in 1907 according to plans by Fritz Beblo and is more spacious and airy. It has a barrel vault, based on the model of St. Michael's Church, Munich and a conspicuous belltower. Severely damaged by Anglo-American bombing on 11 August 1944, it was rebuilt, true to Beblo's original, in 1958.

A part of the former cloisters from the earlier convent can still be seen, surrounding the adjacent school building.

An organ was purchased from Andreas Silbermann on 17 February 1716 and was completed in 1718. It had a manual and an echo - on a specific keyboard - and separate pedals. The instrument was sold in 1799 to the city of Lampertheim, before vanishing in 1876.

The church then owned a first Roethinger organ, which was destroyed during the bombing of 1944. It was then endowed with a second Roethinger organ, which was inaugurated by Michel Chapuis and Robert Pfrimmer on 28 November 1965. It was completely rebuilt by Michel Wolf of Manufacture d'orgues alsacienne in 1997 and 1998, but the harmonization was not modified. Work was done on the cabinet in 2004. The organ was then restored by the firm of Alfred et Daniel Kern, which replaced the keyboards.

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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Religious sites in France

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Achim Trenkle (5 months ago)
Interesting historically ... too bad the pastor left
Marc Issele (6 months ago)
Possible to enter the church 2 p.m. - 6 p.m.
Har Homa (2 years ago)
The Magdalenenkirche (Église Sainte-Madeleine) is a Catholic church complex in Strasbourg. The church, which was almost completely destroyed twice, is now a mixture of Gothic and simplified Art Nouveau. From the former Magdalene convent church, the last sacred Gothic building in Strasbourg (completed in 1478), only the late Gothic choir has survived since a devastating fire in 1904 preserved with original fresco remains. It now serves as a chapel. The current church by Fritz Beblo was added at right angles to the old choir around 1907. It has a barrel vault based on the model of the Michaelskirche in Munich and a striking bell tower. Beblo's new building is much larger than its late medieval predecessor. Beblo's work was severely damaged by British and American bombing on August 11, 1944 and rebuilt unchanged in 1958.
Paul (2 years ago)
Stayed in the hotel nearby only to be woken every morning by the bells ringing from 6am every 15mins. Why can't they ring from a more sensible time like 8am?
Micheline Collet (2 years ago)
Very nice place where I feel good. My little girl will be baptized very soon.
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