St. Paul's Church

Strasbourg, France

The St. Paul's Church is a major Gothic Revival architecture building and one of the landmarks of Strasbourg. Built between 1892 and 1897 during the time of the Reichsland Elsass-Lothringen (1870–1918), the church was designed for the Lutheran members of the Imperial German garrison stationed in Strasbourg. In 1919, after the return of Alsace to France, the church was handed over to the Protestant Reformed Church of Alsace and Lorraine and became its second parish church in the town after Bouclier parish.

For the overall design of the church, architect Louis Muller (1842–1898) drew his inspiration from the Elisabeth Church of Marburg, although he did not slavishly copy its design, gracing St. Paul's Church with three large and elaborate rose windows modelled on the (smaller scaled) rose window adorning the façade of St. Thomas' Church. The 20 m high nave was originally supposed to have four bays instead of three and thus the building to be 5 m longer and shaped like a Latin cross; but because of excessive costs due to technical difficulties with the foundations, it was shortened to a Greek cross. Thanks to its spires rising up to 76 m and its spectacular location at the southern extremity of an island in the middle of the largest section of the Ill River, the church can be seen from far away.

The church furnishings were damaged from British and American bombing raids in August 1944, as well as, as far as the stained glass windows are concerned, from a violent hailstorm in 1958, incidentally the same hailstorm that destroyed most of the Botanical Garden's historical greenhouses. The most outstanding feature inside is the main tribune pipe organ of 1897 (modified in 1934 and restored several times since). This is, by the number of pipes and registers as well as by the sheer size of the organ case, one of the largest instruments in Alsace and most probably Eastern France. In 1976, a second pipe organ was installed in the transept.

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Details

Founded: 1892-1897
Category: Religious sites in France

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Hatcha Taha (9 months ago)
Very beautiful building, especially from the bridges of the opposite side, the far you get the more beautiful the view gets.
D&C Lambert (11 months ago)
This is a beautiful piece of architecture in a lovely location
James Stephen Medes (11 months ago)
A very pretty Protestant cathedral, classic in that austere style and internal decoration. The staff were friendly and welcoming. The many large stain glass windows are beautiful. The fantastic outside view over the river reminiscent of Paris Notre Dame. With a look if you're passing.
M. Yilmaz (14 months ago)
"Built between 1892 and 1897 during the time of the Reichsland Elsass-Lothringen (1870–1918), the church was designed for the Lutheran members of the Imperial German garrison stationed in Strasbourg" Source Wikipedia
Andrew Levine (18 months ago)
This spacious, gothic church is a wonderful, visually and acoustically appealing space, well suited to intricate music. I feel very fortunate to have been able to experience a magical performance by Ellen Fullman here in Autumn 2022.
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