St. Paul's Church

Strasbourg, France

The St. Paul's Church is a major Gothic Revival architecture building and one of the landmarks of Strasbourg. Built between 1892 and 1897 during the time of the Reichsland Elsass-Lothringen (1870–1918), the church was designed for the Lutheran members of the Imperial German garrison stationed in Strasbourg. In 1919, after the return of Alsace to France, the church was handed over to the Protestant Reformed Church of Alsace and Lorraine and became its second parish church in the town after Bouclier parish.

For the overall design of the church, architect Louis Muller (1842–1898) drew his inspiration from the Elisabeth Church of Marburg, although he did not slavishly copy its design, gracing St. Paul's Church with three large and elaborate rose windows modelled on the (smaller scaled) rose window adorning the façade of St. Thomas' Church. The 20 m high nave was originally supposed to have four bays instead of three and thus the building to be 5 m longer and shaped like a Latin cross; but because of excessive costs due to technical difficulties with the foundations, it was shortened to a Greek cross. Thanks to its spires rising up to 76 m and its spectacular location at the southern extremity of an island in the middle of the largest section of the Ill River, the church can be seen from far away.

The church furnishings were damaged from British and American bombing raids in August 1944, as well as, as far as the stained glass windows are concerned, from a violent hailstorm in 1958, incidentally the same hailstorm that destroyed most of the Botanical Garden's historical greenhouses. The most outstanding feature inside is the main tribune pipe organ of 1897 (modified in 1934 and restored several times since). This is, by the number of pipes and registers as well as by the sheer size of the organ case, one of the largest instruments in Alsace and most probably Eastern France. In 1976, a second pipe organ was installed in the transept.

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Details

Founded: 1892-1897
Category: Religious sites in France

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

TINA MERTINAT (20 months ago)
hana goto (2 years ago)
中に入ってないけど、外観だけで絵になる
Lots Of Laughs (2 years ago)
It has now been added to the list of Historical monuments by the French government. The church was built in a neo-gothic style, reminiscent of St Elizabeth's in Marburg (Hessen 13th century). Its two spires are 76 meters (250 feet) high, towering above the fork between the Ill and Aar rivers. One of the beautiful church in this world.
Ioana Stroescu (2 years ago)
Este impresionanta ,dar nu pare primitoare.Reprezintă insa,o vedere minunata de pe malul Ilului sau de pe vaporaș.
Cédric Moser (3 years ago)
Belle porte. ;)
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